A. The vPC domain has already been configured
B. The vPC links have to be configured before the vPC domain can be added
C. vPC domain cannot be configured at the global prompt
D. Have not yet turned on the vpc feature using the 'feature vpc' command
Answer: D

NEW QUESTION: 3
What is the name of the protocol use to set up and manage Security Associations (SA) for IP Security (IPSec)?
A. Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
B. Secure Key Exchange Mechanism
C. Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol
D. Oakley
Answer: A
Explanation:
Explanation/Reference:
The Key management for IPSec is called the Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
Note: IKE underwent a series of improvements establishing IKEv2 with RFC 4306. The basis of this answer is IKEv2.
The IKE protocol is a hybrid of three other protocols: ISAKMP (Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol), Oakley and SKEME. ISAKMP provides a framework for authentication and key exchange, but does not define them (neither authentication nor key exchange). The Oakley protocol describes a series of modes for key exchange and the SKEME protocol defines key exchange techniques.
IKE-Internet Key Exchange. A hybrid protocol that implements Oakley and Skeme key exchanges inside the ISAKMP framework. IKE can be used with other protocols, but its initial implementation is with the IPSec protocol. IKE provides authentication of the IPSec peers, negotiates IPSec keys, and negotiates IPSec security associations.
IKE is implemented in accordance with RFC 2409, The Internet Key Exchange.
The Internet Key Exchange (IKE) security protocol is a key management protocol standard that is used in conjunction with the IPSec standard. IPSec can be configured without IKE, but IKE enhances IPSec by providing additional features, flexibility, and ease of configuration for the IPSec standard.
IKE is a hybrid protocol that implements the Oakley key exchange and the SKEME key exchange inside the Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) framework. (ISAKMP, Oakley, and SKEME are security protocols implemented by IKE.)
IKE automatically negotiates IPSec security associations (SAs) and enables IPSec secure communications without costly manual preconfiguration. Specifically, IKE provides these benefits:
*Eliminates the need to manually specify all the IPSec security parameters in the crypto maps at both peers.
*Allows you to specify a lifetime for the IPSec security association.
*Allows encryption keys to change during IPSec sessions.
*Allows IPSec to provide anti-replay services.
*Permits certification authority (CA) support for a manageable, scalable IPSec implementation.
*Allows dynamic authentication of peers.
About ISAKMP
The Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) is a framework that defines the phases for establishing a secure relationship and support for negotiation of security attributes, it does not establish sessions keys by itself, it is used along with the Oakley session key establishment protocol. The Secure Key Exchange Mechanism (SKEME) describes a secure exchange mechanism and Oakley defines the modes of operation needed to establish a secure connection.
ISAKMP provides a framework for Internet key management and provides the specific protocol support for negotiation of security attributes. Alone, it does not establish session keys. However it can be used with various session key establishment protocols, such as Oakley, to provide a complete solution to Internet key management.
About Oakley
The Oakley protocol uses a hybrid Diffie-Hellman technique to establish session keys on Internet hosts and routers. Oakley provides the important security property of Perfect Forward Secrecy (PFS) and is based on cryptographic techniques that have survived substantial public scrutiny. Oakley can be used by itself, if no attribute negotiation is needed, or Oakley can be used in conjunction with ISAKMP. When ISAKMP is used with Oakley, key escrow is not feasible.
The ISAKMP and Oakley protocols have been combined into a hybrid protocol. The resolution of ISAKMP with Oakley uses the framework of ISAKMP to support a subset of Oakley key exchange modes. This new key exchange protocol provides optional PFS, full security association attribute negotiation, and authentication methods that provide both repudiation and non-repudiation. Implementations of this protocol can be used to establish VPNs and also allow for users from remote sites (who may have a dynamically allocated IP address) access to a secure network.
About IPSec
The IETF's IPSec Working Group develops standards for IP-layer security mechanisms for both IPv4 and IPv6. The group also is developing generic key management protocols for use on the Internet. For more information, refer to the IP Security and Encryption Overview.
IPSec is a framework of open standards developed by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) that provides security for transmission of sensitive information over unprotected networks such as the Internet.
It acts at the network level and implements the following standards:
IPSec
Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
Data Encryption Standard (DES)
MD5 (HMAC variant)
SHA (HMAC variant)
Authentication Header (AH)
Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP)
IPSec services provide a robust security solution that is standards-based. IPSec also provides data authentication and anti-replay services in addition to data confidentiality services.
For more information regarding IPSec, refer to the chapter "Configuring IPSec Network Security." About SKEME
SKEME constitutes a compact protocol that supports a variety of realistic scenarios and security models over Internet. It provides clear tradeoffs between security and performance as required by the different scenarios without incurring in unnecessary system complexity. The protocol supports key exchange based on public key, key distribution centers, or manual installation, and provides for fast and secure key refreshment. In addition, SKEME selectively provides perfect forward secrecy, allows for replaceability and negotiation of the underlying cryptographic primitives, and addresses privacy issues as anonymity and repudiatability
SKEME's basic mode is based on the use of public keys and a Diffie-Hellman shared secret generation.
However, SKEME is not restricted to the use of public keys, but also allows the use of a pre-shared key.
This key can be obtained by manual distribution or by the intermediary of a key distribution center (KDC) such as Kerberos.
In short, SKEME contains four distinct modes:
Basic mode, which provides a key exchange based on public keys and ensures PFS thanks to Diffie- Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of public keys, but without Diffie-Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of a pre-shared key and on Diffie-Hellman.
A mechanism of fast rekeying based only on symmetrical algorithms.
In addition, SKEME is composed of three phases: SHARE, EXCH and AUTH.
During the SHARE phase, the peers exchange half-keys, encrypted with their respective public keys.
These two half-keys are used to compute a secret key K. If anonymity is wanted, the identities of the two peers are also encrypted. If a shared secret already exists, this phase is skipped.
The exchange phase (EXCH) is used, depending on the selected mode, to exchange either Diffie- Hellman public values or nonces. The Diffie-Hellman shared secret will only be computed after the end of the exchanges.
The public values or nonces are authenticated during the authentication phase (AUTH), using the secret key established during the SHARE phase.
The messages from these three phases do not necessarily follow the order described above; in actual practice they are combined to minimize the number of exchanged messages.
References used for this question:
Source: KRUTZ, Ronald L. & VINES, Russel D., The CISSP Prep Guide: Mastering the Ten Domains of Computer Security, John Wiley & Sons, 2001, Chapter 4: Cryptography (page 172).
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4306
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4301
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_Key_Exchange
CISCO ISAKMP and OAKLEY information
CISCO Configuring Internet Key Exchange Protocol
http://www.hsc.fr/ressources/articles/ipsec-tech/index.html.en

NEW QUESTION: 4
A customer must perform trend analysis for future growth. Which product should be included in the design?
A. IBM System Director
B. IBM Tivoli Performance Analyzer
C. IBM Tivoli Monitoring Agent Builder
D. IBM Tivoli Common Reporting
Answer: B

, ' marker.Nexus-5548-B(config)#
A. The vPC domain has already been configured
B. The vPC links have to be configured before the vPC domain can be added
C. vPC domain cannot be configured at the global prompt
D. Have not yet turned on the vpc feature using the 'feature vpc' command
Answer: D

NEW QUESTION: 3
What is the name of the protocol use to set up and manage Security Associations (SA) for IP Security (IPSec)?
A. Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
B. Secure Key Exchange Mechanism
C. Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol
D. Oakley
Answer: A
Explanation:
Explanation/Reference:
The Key management for IPSec is called the Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
Note: IKE underwent a series of improvements establishing IKEv2 with RFC 4306. The basis of this answer is IKEv2.
The IKE protocol is a hybrid of three other protocols: ISAKMP (Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol), Oakley and SKEME. ISAKMP provides a framework for authentication and key exchange, but does not define them (neither authentication nor key exchange). The Oakley protocol describes a series of modes for key exchange and the SKEME protocol defines key exchange techniques.
IKE-Internet Key Exchange. A hybrid protocol that implements Oakley and Skeme key exchanges inside the ISAKMP framework. IKE can be used with other protocols, but its initial implementation is with the IPSec protocol. IKE provides authentication of the IPSec peers, negotiates IPSec keys, and negotiates IPSec security associations.
IKE is implemented in accordance with RFC 2409, The Internet Key Exchange.
The Internet Key Exchange (IKE) security protocol is a key management protocol standard that is used in conjunction with the IPSec standard. IPSec can be configured without IKE, but IKE enhances IPSec by providing additional features, flexibility, and ease of configuration for the IPSec standard.
IKE is a hybrid protocol that implements the Oakley key exchange and the SKEME key exchange inside the Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) framework. (ISAKMP, Oakley, and SKEME are security protocols implemented by IKE.)
IKE automatically negotiates IPSec security associations (SAs) and enables IPSec secure communications without costly manual preconfiguration. Specifically, IKE provides these benefits:
*Eliminates the need to manually specify all the IPSec security parameters in the crypto maps at both peers.
*Allows you to specify a lifetime for the IPSec security association.
*Allows encryption keys to change during IPSec sessions.
*Allows IPSec to provide anti-replay services.
*Permits certification authority (CA) support for a manageable, scalable IPSec implementation.
*Allows dynamic authentication of peers.
About ISAKMP
The Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) is a framework that defines the phases for establishing a secure relationship and support for negotiation of security attributes, it does not establish sessions keys by itself, it is used along with the Oakley session key establishment protocol. The Secure Key Exchange Mechanism (SKEME) describes a secure exchange mechanism and Oakley defines the modes of operation needed to establish a secure connection.
ISAKMP provides a framework for Internet key management and provides the specific protocol support for negotiation of security attributes. Alone, it does not establish session keys. However it can be used with various session key establishment protocols, such as Oakley, to provide a complete solution to Internet key management.
About Oakley
The Oakley protocol uses a hybrid Diffie-Hellman technique to establish session keys on Internet hosts and routers. Oakley provides the important security property of Perfect Forward Secrecy (PFS) and is based on cryptographic techniques that have survived substantial public scrutiny. Oakley can be used by itself, if no attribute negotiation is needed, or Oakley can be used in conjunction with ISAKMP. When ISAKMP is used with Oakley, key escrow is not feasible.
The ISAKMP and Oakley protocols have been combined into a hybrid protocol. The resolution of ISAKMP with Oakley uses the framework of ISAKMP to support a subset of Oakley key exchange modes. This new key exchange protocol provides optional PFS, full security association attribute negotiation, and authentication methods that provide both repudiation and non-repudiation. Implementations of this protocol can be used to establish VPNs and also allow for users from remote sites (who may have a dynamically allocated IP address) access to a secure network.
About IPSec
The IETF's IPSec Working Group develops standards for IP-layer security mechanisms for both IPv4 and IPv6. The group also is developing generic key management protocols for use on the Internet. For more information, refer to the IP Security and Encryption Overview.
IPSec is a framework of open standards developed by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) that provides security for transmission of sensitive information over unprotected networks such as the Internet.
It acts at the network level and implements the following standards:
IPSec
Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
Data Encryption Standard (DES)
MD5 (HMAC variant)
SHA (HMAC variant)
Authentication Header (AH)
Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP)
IPSec services provide a robust security solution that is standards-based. IPSec also provides data authentication and anti-replay services in addition to data confidentiality services.
For more information regarding IPSec, refer to the chapter "Configuring IPSec Network Security." About SKEME
SKEME constitutes a compact protocol that supports a variety of realistic scenarios and security models over Internet. It provides clear tradeoffs between security and performance as required by the different scenarios without incurring in unnecessary system complexity. The protocol supports key exchange based on public key, key distribution centers, or manual installation, and provides for fast and secure key refreshment. In addition, SKEME selectively provides perfect forward secrecy, allows for replaceability and negotiation of the underlying cryptographic primitives, and addresses privacy issues as anonymity and repudiatability
SKEME's basic mode is based on the use of public keys and a Diffie-Hellman shared secret generation.
However, SKEME is not restricted to the use of public keys, but also allows the use of a pre-shared key.
This key can be obtained by manual distribution or by the intermediary of a key distribution center (KDC) such as Kerberos.
In short, SKEME contains four distinct modes:
Basic mode, which provides a key exchange based on public keys and ensures PFS thanks to Diffie- Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of public keys, but without Diffie-Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of a pre-shared key and on Diffie-Hellman.
A mechanism of fast rekeying based only on symmetrical algorithms.
In addition, SKEME is composed of three phases: SHARE, EXCH and AUTH.
During the SHARE phase, the peers exchange half-keys, encrypted with their respective public keys.
These two half-keys are used to compute a secret key K. If anonymity is wanted, the identities of the two peers are also encrypted. If a shared secret already exists, this phase is skipped.
The exchange phase (EXCH) is used, depending on the selected mode, to exchange either Diffie- Hellman public values or nonces. The Diffie-Hellman shared secret will only be computed after the end of the exchanges.
The public values or nonces are authenticated during the authentication phase (AUTH), using the secret key established during the SHARE phase.
The messages from these three phases do not necessarily follow the order described above; in actual practice they are combined to minimize the number of exchanged messages.
References used for this question:
Source: KRUTZ, Ronald L. & VINES, Russel D., The CISSP Prep Guide: Mastering the Ten Domains of Computer Security, John Wiley & Sons, 2001, Chapter 4: Cryptography (page 172).
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4306
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4301
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_Key_Exchange
CISCO ISAKMP and OAKLEY information
CISCO Configuring Internet Key Exchange Protocol
http://www.hsc.fr/ressources/articles/ipsec-tech/index.html.en

NEW QUESTION: 4
A customer must perform trend analysis for future growth. Which product should be included in the design?
A. IBM System Director
B. IBM Tivoli Performance Analyzer
C. IBM Tivoli Monitoring Agent Builder
D. IBM Tivoli Common Reporting
Answer: B

Exam, ' marker.Nexus-5548-B(config)#
A. The vPC domain has already been configured
B. The vPC links have to be configured before the vPC domain can be added
C. vPC domain cannot be configured at the global prompt
D. Have not yet turned on the vpc feature using the 'feature vpc' command
Answer: D

NEW QUESTION: 3
What is the name of the protocol use to set up and manage Security Associations (SA) for IP Security (IPSec)?
A. Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
B. Secure Key Exchange Mechanism
C. Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol
D. Oakley
Answer: A
Explanation:
Explanation/Reference:
The Key management for IPSec is called the Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
Note: IKE underwent a series of improvements establishing IKEv2 with RFC 4306. The basis of this answer is IKEv2.
The IKE protocol is a hybrid of three other protocols: ISAKMP (Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol), Oakley and SKEME. ISAKMP provides a framework for authentication and key exchange, but does not define them (neither authentication nor key exchange). The Oakley protocol describes a series of modes for key exchange and the SKEME protocol defines key exchange techniques.
IKE-Internet Key Exchange. A hybrid protocol that implements Oakley and Skeme key exchanges inside the ISAKMP framework. IKE can be used with other protocols, but its initial implementation is with the IPSec protocol. IKE provides authentication of the IPSec peers, negotiates IPSec keys, and negotiates IPSec security associations.
IKE is implemented in accordance with RFC 2409, The Internet Key Exchange.
The Internet Key Exchange (IKE) security protocol is a key management protocol standard that is used in conjunction with the IPSec standard. IPSec can be configured without IKE, but IKE enhances IPSec by providing additional features, flexibility, and ease of configuration for the IPSec standard.
IKE is a hybrid protocol that implements the Oakley key exchange and the SKEME key exchange inside the Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) framework. (ISAKMP, Oakley, and SKEME are security protocols implemented by IKE.)
IKE automatically negotiates IPSec security associations (SAs) and enables IPSec secure communications without costly manual preconfiguration. Specifically, IKE provides these benefits:
*Eliminates the need to manually specify all the IPSec security parameters in the crypto maps at both peers.
*Allows you to specify a lifetime for the IPSec security association.
*Allows encryption keys to change during IPSec sessions.
*Allows IPSec to provide anti-replay services.
*Permits certification authority (CA) support for a manageable, scalable IPSec implementation.
*Allows dynamic authentication of peers.
About ISAKMP
The Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) is a framework that defines the phases for establishing a secure relationship and support for negotiation of security attributes, it does not establish sessions keys by itself, it is used along with the Oakley session key establishment protocol. The Secure Key Exchange Mechanism (SKEME) describes a secure exchange mechanism and Oakley defines the modes of operation needed to establish a secure connection.
ISAKMP provides a framework for Internet key management and provides the specific protocol support for negotiation of security attributes. Alone, it does not establish session keys. However it can be used with various session key establishment protocols, such as Oakley, to provide a complete solution to Internet key management.
About Oakley
The Oakley protocol uses a hybrid Diffie-Hellman technique to establish session keys on Internet hosts and routers. Oakley provides the important security property of Perfect Forward Secrecy (PFS) and is based on cryptographic techniques that have survived substantial public scrutiny. Oakley can be used by itself, if no attribute negotiation is needed, or Oakley can be used in conjunction with ISAKMP. When ISAKMP is used with Oakley, key escrow is not feasible.
The ISAKMP and Oakley protocols have been combined into a hybrid protocol. The resolution of ISAKMP with Oakley uses the framework of ISAKMP to support a subset of Oakley key exchange modes. This new key exchange protocol provides optional PFS, full security association attribute negotiation, and authentication methods that provide both repudiation and non-repudiation. Implementations of this protocol can be used to establish VPNs and also allow for users from remote sites (who may have a dynamically allocated IP address) access to a secure network.
About IPSec
The IETF's IPSec Working Group develops standards for IP-layer security mechanisms for both IPv4 and IPv6. The group also is developing generic key management protocols for use on the Internet. For more information, refer to the IP Security and Encryption Overview.
IPSec is a framework of open standards developed by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) that provides security for transmission of sensitive information over unprotected networks such as the Internet.
It acts at the network level and implements the following standards:
IPSec
Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
Data Encryption Standard (DES)
MD5 (HMAC variant)
SHA (HMAC variant)
Authentication Header (AH)
Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP)
IPSec services provide a robust security solution that is standards-based. IPSec also provides data authentication and anti-replay services in addition to data confidentiality services.
For more information regarding IPSec, refer to the chapter "Configuring IPSec Network Security." About SKEME
SKEME constitutes a compact protocol that supports a variety of realistic scenarios and security models over Internet. It provides clear tradeoffs between security and performance as required by the different scenarios without incurring in unnecessary system complexity. The protocol supports key exchange based on public key, key distribution centers, or manual installation, and provides for fast and secure key refreshment. In addition, SKEME selectively provides perfect forward secrecy, allows for replaceability and negotiation of the underlying cryptographic primitives, and addresses privacy issues as anonymity and repudiatability
SKEME's basic mode is based on the use of public keys and a Diffie-Hellman shared secret generation.
However, SKEME is not restricted to the use of public keys, but also allows the use of a pre-shared key.
This key can be obtained by manual distribution or by the intermediary of a key distribution center (KDC) such as Kerberos.
In short, SKEME contains four distinct modes:
Basic mode, which provides a key exchange based on public keys and ensures PFS thanks to Diffie- Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of public keys, but without Diffie-Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of a pre-shared key and on Diffie-Hellman.
A mechanism of fast rekeying based only on symmetrical algorithms.
In addition, SKEME is composed of three phases: SHARE, EXCH and AUTH.
During the SHARE phase, the peers exchange half-keys, encrypted with their respective public keys.
These two half-keys are used to compute a secret key K. If anonymity is wanted, the identities of the two peers are also encrypted. If a shared secret already exists, this phase is skipped.
The exchange phase (EXCH) is used, depending on the selected mode, to exchange either Diffie- Hellman public values or nonces. The Diffie-Hellman shared secret will only be computed after the end of the exchanges.
The public values or nonces are authenticated during the authentication phase (AUTH), using the secret key established during the SHARE phase.
The messages from these three phases do not necessarily follow the order described above; in actual practice they are combined to minimize the number of exchanged messages.
References used for this question:
Source: KRUTZ, Ronald L. & VINES, Russel D., The CISSP Prep Guide: Mastering the Ten Domains of Computer Security, John Wiley & Sons, 2001, Chapter 4: Cryptography (page 172).
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4306
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4301
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_Key_Exchange
CISCO ISAKMP and OAKLEY information
CISCO Configuring Internet Key Exchange Protocol
http://www.hsc.fr/ressources/articles/ipsec-tech/index.html.en

NEW QUESTION: 4
A customer must perform trend analysis for future growth. Which product should be included in the design?
A. IBM System Director
B. IBM Tivoli Performance Analyzer
C. IBM Tivoli Monitoring Agent Builder
D. IBM Tivoli Common Reporting
Answer: B

BrainDumps, ' marker.Nexus-5548-B(config)#
A. The vPC domain has already been configured
B. The vPC links have to be configured before the vPC domain can be added
C. vPC domain cannot be configured at the global prompt
D. Have not yet turned on the vpc feature using the 'feature vpc' command
Answer: D

NEW QUESTION: 3
What is the name of the protocol use to set up and manage Security Associations (SA) for IP Security (IPSec)?
A. Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
B. Secure Key Exchange Mechanism
C. Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol
D. Oakley
Answer: A
Explanation:
Explanation/Reference:
The Key management for IPSec is called the Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
Note: IKE underwent a series of improvements establishing IKEv2 with RFC 4306. The basis of this answer is IKEv2.
The IKE protocol is a hybrid of three other protocols: ISAKMP (Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol), Oakley and SKEME. ISAKMP provides a framework for authentication and key exchange, but does not define them (neither authentication nor key exchange). The Oakley protocol describes a series of modes for key exchange and the SKEME protocol defines key exchange techniques.
IKE-Internet Key Exchange. A hybrid protocol that implements Oakley and Skeme key exchanges inside the ISAKMP framework. IKE can be used with other protocols, but its initial implementation is with the IPSec protocol. IKE provides authentication of the IPSec peers, negotiates IPSec keys, and negotiates IPSec security associations.
IKE is implemented in accordance with RFC 2409, The Internet Key Exchange.
The Internet Key Exchange (IKE) security protocol is a key management protocol standard that is used in conjunction with the IPSec standard. IPSec can be configured without IKE, but IKE enhances IPSec by providing additional features, flexibility, and ease of configuration for the IPSec standard.
IKE is a hybrid protocol that implements the Oakley key exchange and the SKEME key exchange inside the Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) framework. (ISAKMP, Oakley, and SKEME are security protocols implemented by IKE.)
IKE automatically negotiates IPSec security associations (SAs) and enables IPSec secure communications without costly manual preconfiguration. Specifically, IKE provides these benefits:
*Eliminates the need to manually specify all the IPSec security parameters in the crypto maps at both peers.
*Allows you to specify a lifetime for the IPSec security association.
*Allows encryption keys to change during IPSec sessions.
*Allows IPSec to provide anti-replay services.
*Permits certification authority (CA) support for a manageable, scalable IPSec implementation.
*Allows dynamic authentication of peers.
About ISAKMP
The Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) is a framework that defines the phases for establishing a secure relationship and support for negotiation of security attributes, it does not establish sessions keys by itself, it is used along with the Oakley session key establishment protocol. The Secure Key Exchange Mechanism (SKEME) describes a secure exchange mechanism and Oakley defines the modes of operation needed to establish a secure connection.
ISAKMP provides a framework for Internet key management and provides the specific protocol support for negotiation of security attributes. Alone, it does not establish session keys. However it can be used with various session key establishment protocols, such as Oakley, to provide a complete solution to Internet key management.
About Oakley
The Oakley protocol uses a hybrid Diffie-Hellman technique to establish session keys on Internet hosts and routers. Oakley provides the important security property of Perfect Forward Secrecy (PFS) and is based on cryptographic techniques that have survived substantial public scrutiny. Oakley can be used by itself, if no attribute negotiation is needed, or Oakley can be used in conjunction with ISAKMP. When ISAKMP is used with Oakley, key escrow is not feasible.
The ISAKMP and Oakley protocols have been combined into a hybrid protocol. The resolution of ISAKMP with Oakley uses the framework of ISAKMP to support a subset of Oakley key exchange modes. This new key exchange protocol provides optional PFS, full security association attribute negotiation, and authentication methods that provide both repudiation and non-repudiation. Implementations of this protocol can be used to establish VPNs and also allow for users from remote sites (who may have a dynamically allocated IP address) access to a secure network.
About IPSec
The IETF's IPSec Working Group develops standards for IP-layer security mechanisms for both IPv4 and IPv6. The group also is developing generic key management protocols for use on the Internet. For more information, refer to the IP Security and Encryption Overview.
IPSec is a framework of open standards developed by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) that provides security for transmission of sensitive information over unprotected networks such as the Internet.
It acts at the network level and implements the following standards:
IPSec
Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
Data Encryption Standard (DES)
MD5 (HMAC variant)
SHA (HMAC variant)
Authentication Header (AH)
Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP)
IPSec services provide a robust security solution that is standards-based. IPSec also provides data authentication and anti-replay services in addition to data confidentiality services.
For more information regarding IPSec, refer to the chapter "Configuring IPSec Network Security." About SKEME
SKEME constitutes a compact protocol that supports a variety of realistic scenarios and security models over Internet. It provides clear tradeoffs between security and performance as required by the different scenarios without incurring in unnecessary system complexity. The protocol supports key exchange based on public key, key distribution centers, or manual installation, and provides for fast and secure key refreshment. In addition, SKEME selectively provides perfect forward secrecy, allows for replaceability and negotiation of the underlying cryptographic primitives, and addresses privacy issues as anonymity and repudiatability
SKEME's basic mode is based on the use of public keys and a Diffie-Hellman shared secret generation.
However, SKEME is not restricted to the use of public keys, but also allows the use of a pre-shared key.
This key can be obtained by manual distribution or by the intermediary of a key distribution center (KDC) such as Kerberos.
In short, SKEME contains four distinct modes:
Basic mode, which provides a key exchange based on public keys and ensures PFS thanks to Diffie- Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of public keys, but without Diffie-Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of a pre-shared key and on Diffie-Hellman.
A mechanism of fast rekeying based only on symmetrical algorithms.
In addition, SKEME is composed of three phases: SHARE, EXCH and AUTH.
During the SHARE phase, the peers exchange half-keys, encrypted with their respective public keys.
These two half-keys are used to compute a secret key K. If anonymity is wanted, the identities of the two peers are also encrypted. If a shared secret already exists, this phase is skipped.
The exchange phase (EXCH) is used, depending on the selected mode, to exchange either Diffie- Hellman public values or nonces. The Diffie-Hellman shared secret will only be computed after the end of the exchanges.
The public values or nonces are authenticated during the authentication phase (AUTH), using the secret key established during the SHARE phase.
The messages from these three phases do not necessarily follow the order described above; in actual practice they are combined to minimize the number of exchanged messages.
References used for this question:
Source: KRUTZ, Ronald L. & VINES, Russel D., The CISSP Prep Guide: Mastering the Ten Domains of Computer Security, John Wiley & Sons, 2001, Chapter 4: Cryptography (page 172).
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4306
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4301
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_Key_Exchange
CISCO ISAKMP and OAKLEY information
CISCO Configuring Internet Key Exchange Protocol
http://www.hsc.fr/ressources/articles/ipsec-tech/index.html.en

NEW QUESTION: 4
A customer must perform trend analysis for future growth. Which product should be included in the design?
A. IBM System Director
B. IBM Tivoli Performance Analyzer
C. IBM Tivoli Monitoring Agent Builder
D. IBM Tivoli Common Reporting
Answer: B

Exam Dumps, ' marker.Nexus-5548-B(config)#
A. The vPC domain has already been configured
B. The vPC links have to be configured before the vPC domain can be added
C. vPC domain cannot be configured at the global prompt
D. Have not yet turned on the vpc feature using the 'feature vpc' command
Answer: D

NEW QUESTION: 3
What is the name of the protocol use to set up and manage Security Associations (SA) for IP Security (IPSec)?
A. Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
B. Secure Key Exchange Mechanism
C. Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol
D. Oakley
Answer: A
Explanation:
Explanation/Reference:
The Key management for IPSec is called the Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
Note: IKE underwent a series of improvements establishing IKEv2 with RFC 4306. The basis of this answer is IKEv2.
The IKE protocol is a hybrid of three other protocols: ISAKMP (Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol), Oakley and SKEME. ISAKMP provides a framework for authentication and key exchange, but does not define them (neither authentication nor key exchange). The Oakley protocol describes a series of modes for key exchange and the SKEME protocol defines key exchange techniques.
IKE-Internet Key Exchange. A hybrid protocol that implements Oakley and Skeme key exchanges inside the ISAKMP framework. IKE can be used with other protocols, but its initial implementation is with the IPSec protocol. IKE provides authentication of the IPSec peers, negotiates IPSec keys, and negotiates IPSec security associations.
IKE is implemented in accordance with RFC 2409, The Internet Key Exchange.
The Internet Key Exchange (IKE) security protocol is a key management protocol standard that is used in conjunction with the IPSec standard. IPSec can be configured without IKE, but IKE enhances IPSec by providing additional features, flexibility, and ease of configuration for the IPSec standard.
IKE is a hybrid protocol that implements the Oakley key exchange and the SKEME key exchange inside the Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) framework. (ISAKMP, Oakley, and SKEME are security protocols implemented by IKE.)
IKE automatically negotiates IPSec security associations (SAs) and enables IPSec secure communications without costly manual preconfiguration. Specifically, IKE provides these benefits:
*Eliminates the need to manually specify all the IPSec security parameters in the crypto maps at both peers.
*Allows you to specify a lifetime for the IPSec security association.
*Allows encryption keys to change during IPSec sessions.
*Allows IPSec to provide anti-replay services.
*Permits certification authority (CA) support for a manageable, scalable IPSec implementation.
*Allows dynamic authentication of peers.
About ISAKMP
The Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) is a framework that defines the phases for establishing a secure relationship and support for negotiation of security attributes, it does not establish sessions keys by itself, it is used along with the Oakley session key establishment protocol. The Secure Key Exchange Mechanism (SKEME) describes a secure exchange mechanism and Oakley defines the modes of operation needed to establish a secure connection.
ISAKMP provides a framework for Internet key management and provides the specific protocol support for negotiation of security attributes. Alone, it does not establish session keys. However it can be used with various session key establishment protocols, such as Oakley, to provide a complete solution to Internet key management.
About Oakley
The Oakley protocol uses a hybrid Diffie-Hellman technique to establish session keys on Internet hosts and routers. Oakley provides the important security property of Perfect Forward Secrecy (PFS) and is based on cryptographic techniques that have survived substantial public scrutiny. Oakley can be used by itself, if no attribute negotiation is needed, or Oakley can be used in conjunction with ISAKMP. When ISAKMP is used with Oakley, key escrow is not feasible.
The ISAKMP and Oakley protocols have been combined into a hybrid protocol. The resolution of ISAKMP with Oakley uses the framework of ISAKMP to support a subset of Oakley key exchange modes. This new key exchange protocol provides optional PFS, full security association attribute negotiation, and authentication methods that provide both repudiation and non-repudiation. Implementations of this protocol can be used to establish VPNs and also allow for users from remote sites (who may have a dynamically allocated IP address) access to a secure network.
About IPSec
The IETF's IPSec Working Group develops standards for IP-layer security mechanisms for both IPv4 and IPv6. The group also is developing generic key management protocols for use on the Internet. For more information, refer to the IP Security and Encryption Overview.
IPSec is a framework of open standards developed by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) that provides security for transmission of sensitive information over unprotected networks such as the Internet.
It acts at the network level and implements the following standards:
IPSec
Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
Data Encryption Standard (DES)
MD5 (HMAC variant)
SHA (HMAC variant)
Authentication Header (AH)
Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP)
IPSec services provide a robust security solution that is standards-based. IPSec also provides data authentication and anti-replay services in addition to data confidentiality services.
For more information regarding IPSec, refer to the chapter "Configuring IPSec Network Security." About SKEME
SKEME constitutes a compact protocol that supports a variety of realistic scenarios and security models over Internet. It provides clear tradeoffs between security and performance as required by the different scenarios without incurring in unnecessary system complexity. The protocol supports key exchange based on public key, key distribution centers, or manual installation, and provides for fast and secure key refreshment. In addition, SKEME selectively provides perfect forward secrecy, allows for replaceability and negotiation of the underlying cryptographic primitives, and addresses privacy issues as anonymity and repudiatability
SKEME's basic mode is based on the use of public keys and a Diffie-Hellman shared secret generation.
However, SKEME is not restricted to the use of public keys, but also allows the use of a pre-shared key.
This key can be obtained by manual distribution or by the intermediary of a key distribution center (KDC) such as Kerberos.
In short, SKEME contains four distinct modes:
Basic mode, which provides a key exchange based on public keys and ensures PFS thanks to Diffie- Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of public keys, but without Diffie-Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of a pre-shared key and on Diffie-Hellman.
A mechanism of fast rekeying based only on symmetrical algorithms.
In addition, SKEME is composed of three phases: SHARE, EXCH and AUTH.
During the SHARE phase, the peers exchange half-keys, encrypted with their respective public keys.
These two half-keys are used to compute a secret key K. If anonymity is wanted, the identities of the two peers are also encrypted. If a shared secret already exists, this phase is skipped.
The exchange phase (EXCH) is used, depending on the selected mode, to exchange either Diffie- Hellman public values or nonces. The Diffie-Hellman shared secret will only be computed after the end of the exchanges.
The public values or nonces are authenticated during the authentication phase (AUTH), using the secret key established during the SHARE phase.
The messages from these three phases do not necessarily follow the order described above; in actual practice they are combined to minimize the number of exchanged messages.
References used for this question:
Source: KRUTZ, Ronald L. & VINES, Russel D., The CISSP Prep Guide: Mastering the Ten Domains of Computer Security, John Wiley & Sons, 2001, Chapter 4: Cryptography (page 172).
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4306
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4301
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_Key_Exchange
CISCO ISAKMP and OAKLEY information
CISCO Configuring Internet Key Exchange Protocol
http://www.hsc.fr/ressources/articles/ipsec-tech/index.html.en

NEW QUESTION: 4
A customer must perform trend analysis for future growth. Which product should be included in the design?
A. IBM System Director
B. IBM Tivoli Performance Analyzer
C. IBM Tivoli Monitoring Agent Builder
D. IBM Tivoli Common Reporting
Answer: B

Questions"> A. The vPC domain has already been configured
B. The vPC links have to be configured before the vPC domain can be added
C. vPC domain cannot be configured at the global prompt
D. Have not yet turned on the vpc feature using the 'feature vpc' command
Answer: D

NEW QUESTION: 3
What is the name of the protocol use to set up and manage Security Associations (SA) for IP Security (IPSec)?
A. Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
B. Secure Key Exchange Mechanism
C. Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol
D. Oakley
Answer: A
Explanation:
Explanation/Reference:
The Key management for IPSec is called the Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
Note: IKE underwent a series of improvements establishing IKEv2 with RFC 4306. The basis of this answer is IKEv2.
The IKE protocol is a hybrid of three other protocols: ISAKMP (Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol), Oakley and SKEME. ISAKMP provides a framework for authentication and key exchange, but does not define them (neither authentication nor key exchange). The Oakley protocol describes a series of modes for key exchange and the SKEME protocol defines key exchange techniques.
IKE-Internet Key Exchange. A hybrid protocol that implements Oakley and Skeme key exchanges inside the ISAKMP framework. IKE can be used with other protocols, but its initial implementation is with the IPSec protocol. IKE provides authentication of the IPSec peers, negotiates IPSec keys, and negotiates IPSec security associations.
IKE is implemented in accordance with RFC 2409, The Internet Key Exchange.
The Internet Key Exchange (IKE) security protocol is a key management protocol standard that is used in conjunction with the IPSec standard. IPSec can be configured without IKE, but IKE enhances IPSec by providing additional features, flexibility, and ease of configuration for the IPSec standard.
IKE is a hybrid protocol that implements the Oakley key exchange and the SKEME key exchange inside the Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) framework. (ISAKMP, Oakley, and SKEME are security protocols implemented by IKE.)
IKE automatically negotiates IPSec security associations (SAs) and enables IPSec secure communications without costly manual preconfiguration. Specifically, IKE provides these benefits:
*Eliminates the need to manually specify all the IPSec security parameters in the crypto maps at both peers.
*Allows you to specify a lifetime for the IPSec security association.
*Allows encryption keys to change during IPSec sessions.
*Allows IPSec to provide anti-replay services.
*Permits certification authority (CA) support for a manageable, scalable IPSec implementation.
*Allows dynamic authentication of peers.
About ISAKMP
The Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) is a framework that defines the phases for establishing a secure relationship and support for negotiation of security attributes, it does not establish sessions keys by itself, it is used along with the Oakley session key establishment protocol. The Secure Key Exchange Mechanism (SKEME) describes a secure exchange mechanism and Oakley defines the modes of operation needed to establish a secure connection.
ISAKMP provides a framework for Internet key management and provides the specific protocol support for negotiation of security attributes. Alone, it does not establish session keys. However it can be used with various session key establishment protocols, such as Oakley, to provide a complete solution to Internet key management.
About Oakley
The Oakley protocol uses a hybrid Diffie-Hellman technique to establish session keys on Internet hosts and routers. Oakley provides the important security property of Perfect Forward Secrecy (PFS) and is based on cryptographic techniques that have survived substantial public scrutiny. Oakley can be used by itself, if no attribute negotiation is needed, or Oakley can be used in conjunction with ISAKMP. When ISAKMP is used with Oakley, key escrow is not feasible.
The ISAKMP and Oakley protocols have been combined into a hybrid protocol. The resolution of ISAKMP with Oakley uses the framework of ISAKMP to support a subset of Oakley key exchange modes. This new key exchange protocol provides optional PFS, full security association attribute negotiation, and authentication methods that provide both repudiation and non-repudiation. Implementations of this protocol can be used to establish VPNs and also allow for users from remote sites (who may have a dynamically allocated IP address) access to a secure network.
About IPSec
The IETF's IPSec Working Group develops standards for IP-layer security mechanisms for both IPv4 and IPv6. The group also is developing generic key management protocols for use on the Internet. For more information, refer to the IP Security and Encryption Overview.
IPSec is a framework of open standards developed by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) that provides security for transmission of sensitive information over unprotected networks such as the Internet.
It acts at the network level and implements the following standards:
IPSec
Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
Data Encryption Standard (DES)
MD5 (HMAC variant)
SHA (HMAC variant)
Authentication Header (AH)
Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP)
IPSec services provide a robust security solution that is standards-based. IPSec also provides data authentication and anti-replay services in addition to data confidentiality services.
For more information regarding IPSec, refer to the chapter "Configuring IPSec Network Security." About SKEME
SKEME constitutes a compact protocol that supports a variety of realistic scenarios and security models over Internet. It provides clear tradeoffs between security and performance as required by the different scenarios without incurring in unnecessary system complexity. The protocol supports key exchange based on public key, key distribution centers, or manual installation, and provides for fast and secure key refreshment. In addition, SKEME selectively provides perfect forward secrecy, allows for replaceability and negotiation of the underlying cryptographic primitives, and addresses privacy issues as anonymity and repudiatability
SKEME's basic mode is based on the use of public keys and a Diffie-Hellman shared secret generation.
However, SKEME is not restricted to the use of public keys, but also allows the use of a pre-shared key.
This key can be obtained by manual distribution or by the intermediary of a key distribution center (KDC) such as Kerberos.
In short, SKEME contains four distinct modes:
Basic mode, which provides a key exchange based on public keys and ensures PFS thanks to Diffie- Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of public keys, but without Diffie-Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of a pre-shared key and on Diffie-Hellman.
A mechanism of fast rekeying based only on symmetrical algorithms.
In addition, SKEME is composed of three phases: SHARE, EXCH and AUTH.
During the SHARE phase, the peers exchange half-keys, encrypted with their respective public keys.
These two half-keys are used to compute a secret key K. If anonymity is wanted, the identities of the two peers are also encrypted. If a shared secret already exists, this phase is skipped.
The exchange phase (EXCH) is used, depending on the selected mode, to exchange either Diffie- Hellman public values or nonces. The Diffie-Hellman shared secret will only be computed after the end of the exchanges.
The public values or nonces are authenticated during the authentication phase (AUTH), using the secret key established during the SHARE phase.
The messages from these three phases do not necessarily follow the order described above; in actual practice they are combined to minimize the number of exchanged messages.
References used for this question:
Source: KRUTZ, Ronald L. & VINES, Russel D., The CISSP Prep Guide: Mastering the Ten Domains of Computer Security, John Wiley & Sons, 2001, Chapter 4: Cryptography (page 172).
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4306
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4301
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_Key_Exchange
CISCO ISAKMP and OAKLEY information
CISCO Configuring Internet Key Exchange Protocol
http://www.hsc.fr/ressources/articles/ipsec-tech/index.html.en

NEW QUESTION: 4
A customer must perform trend analysis for future growth. Which product should be included in the design?
A. IBM System Director
B. IBM Tivoli Performance Analyzer
C. IBM Tivoli Monitoring Agent Builder
D. IBM Tivoli Common Reporting
Answer: B

exam then Dumps-Questions is here to provide the latest ' marker.Nexus-5548-B(config)#
A. The vPC domain has already been configured
B. The vPC links have to be configured before the vPC domain can be added
C. vPC domain cannot be configured at the global prompt
D. Have not yet turned on the vpc feature using the 'feature vpc' command
Answer: D

NEW QUESTION: 3
What is the name of the protocol use to set up and manage Security Associations (SA) for IP Security (IPSec)?
A. Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
B. Secure Key Exchange Mechanism
C. Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol
D. Oakley
Answer: A
Explanation:
Explanation/Reference:
The Key management for IPSec is called the Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
Note: IKE underwent a series of improvements establishing IKEv2 with RFC 4306. The basis of this answer is IKEv2.
The IKE protocol is a hybrid of three other protocols: ISAKMP (Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol), Oakley and SKEME. ISAKMP provides a framework for authentication and key exchange, but does not define them (neither authentication nor key exchange). The Oakley protocol describes a series of modes for key exchange and the SKEME protocol defines key exchange techniques.
IKE-Internet Key Exchange. A hybrid protocol that implements Oakley and Skeme key exchanges inside the ISAKMP framework. IKE can be used with other protocols, but its initial implementation is with the IPSec protocol. IKE provides authentication of the IPSec peers, negotiates IPSec keys, and negotiates IPSec security associations.
IKE is implemented in accordance with RFC 2409, The Internet Key Exchange.
The Internet Key Exchange (IKE) security protocol is a key management protocol standard that is used in conjunction with the IPSec standard. IPSec can be configured without IKE, but IKE enhances IPSec by providing additional features, flexibility, and ease of configuration for the IPSec standard.
IKE is a hybrid protocol that implements the Oakley key exchange and the SKEME key exchange inside the Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) framework. (ISAKMP, Oakley, and SKEME are security protocols implemented by IKE.)
IKE automatically negotiates IPSec security associations (SAs) and enables IPSec secure communications without costly manual preconfiguration. Specifically, IKE provides these benefits:
*Eliminates the need to manually specify all the IPSec security parameters in the crypto maps at both peers.
*Allows you to specify a lifetime for the IPSec security association.
*Allows encryption keys to change during IPSec sessions.
*Allows IPSec to provide anti-replay services.
*Permits certification authority (CA) support for a manageable, scalable IPSec implementation.
*Allows dynamic authentication of peers.
About ISAKMP
The Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) is a framework that defines the phases for establishing a secure relationship and support for negotiation of security attributes, it does not establish sessions keys by itself, it is used along with the Oakley session key establishment protocol. The Secure Key Exchange Mechanism (SKEME) describes a secure exchange mechanism and Oakley defines the modes of operation needed to establish a secure connection.
ISAKMP provides a framework for Internet key management and provides the specific protocol support for negotiation of security attributes. Alone, it does not establish session keys. However it can be used with various session key establishment protocols, such as Oakley, to provide a complete solution to Internet key management.
About Oakley
The Oakley protocol uses a hybrid Diffie-Hellman technique to establish session keys on Internet hosts and routers. Oakley provides the important security property of Perfect Forward Secrecy (PFS) and is based on cryptographic techniques that have survived substantial public scrutiny. Oakley can be used by itself, if no attribute negotiation is needed, or Oakley can be used in conjunction with ISAKMP. When ISAKMP is used with Oakley, key escrow is not feasible.
The ISAKMP and Oakley protocols have been combined into a hybrid protocol. The resolution of ISAKMP with Oakley uses the framework of ISAKMP to support a subset of Oakley key exchange modes. This new key exchange protocol provides optional PFS, full security association attribute negotiation, and authentication methods that provide both repudiation and non-repudiation. Implementations of this protocol can be used to establish VPNs and also allow for users from remote sites (who may have a dynamically allocated IP address) access to a secure network.
About IPSec
The IETF's IPSec Working Group develops standards for IP-layer security mechanisms for both IPv4 and IPv6. The group also is developing generic key management protocols for use on the Internet. For more information, refer to the IP Security and Encryption Overview.
IPSec is a framework of open standards developed by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) that provides security for transmission of sensitive information over unprotected networks such as the Internet.
It acts at the network level and implements the following standards:
IPSec
Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
Data Encryption Standard (DES)
MD5 (HMAC variant)
SHA (HMAC variant)
Authentication Header (AH)
Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP)
IPSec services provide a robust security solution that is standards-based. IPSec also provides data authentication and anti-replay services in addition to data confidentiality services.
For more information regarding IPSec, refer to the chapter "Configuring IPSec Network Security." About SKEME
SKEME constitutes a compact protocol that supports a variety of realistic scenarios and security models over Internet. It provides clear tradeoffs between security and performance as required by the different scenarios without incurring in unnecessary system complexity. The protocol supports key exchange based on public key, key distribution centers, or manual installation, and provides for fast and secure key refreshment. In addition, SKEME selectively provides perfect forward secrecy, allows for replaceability and negotiation of the underlying cryptographic primitives, and addresses privacy issues as anonymity and repudiatability
SKEME's basic mode is based on the use of public keys and a Diffie-Hellman shared secret generation.
However, SKEME is not restricted to the use of public keys, but also allows the use of a pre-shared key.
This key can be obtained by manual distribution or by the intermediary of a key distribution center (KDC) such as Kerberos.
In short, SKEME contains four distinct modes:
Basic mode, which provides a key exchange based on public keys and ensures PFS thanks to Diffie- Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of public keys, but without Diffie-Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of a pre-shared key and on Diffie-Hellman.
A mechanism of fast rekeying based only on symmetrical algorithms.
In addition, SKEME is composed of three phases: SHARE, EXCH and AUTH.
During the SHARE phase, the peers exchange half-keys, encrypted with their respective public keys.
These two half-keys are used to compute a secret key K. If anonymity is wanted, the identities of the two peers are also encrypted. If a shared secret already exists, this phase is skipped.
The exchange phase (EXCH) is used, depending on the selected mode, to exchange either Diffie- Hellman public values or nonces. The Diffie-Hellman shared secret will only be computed after the end of the exchanges.
The public values or nonces are authenticated during the authentication phase (AUTH), using the secret key established during the SHARE phase.
The messages from these three phases do not necessarily follow the order described above; in actual practice they are combined to minimize the number of exchanged messages.
References used for this question:
Source: KRUTZ, Ronald L. & VINES, Russel D., The CISSP Prep Guide: Mastering the Ten Domains of Computer Security, John Wiley & Sons, 2001, Chapter 4: Cryptography (page 172).
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4306
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4301
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_Key_Exchange
CISCO ISAKMP and OAKLEY information
CISCO Configuring Internet Key Exchange Protocol
http://www.hsc.fr/ressources/articles/ipsec-tech/index.html.en

NEW QUESTION: 4
A customer must perform trend analysis for future growth. Which product should be included in the design?
A. IBM System Director
B. IBM Tivoli Performance Analyzer
C. IBM Tivoli Monitoring Agent Builder
D. IBM Tivoli Common Reporting
Answer: B

dumps, ' marker.Nexus-5548-B(config)#
A. The vPC domain has already been configured
B. The vPC links have to be configured before the vPC domain can be added
C. vPC domain cannot be configured at the global prompt
D. Have not yet turned on the vpc feature using the 'feature vpc' command
Answer: D

NEW QUESTION: 3
What is the name of the protocol use to set up and manage Security Associations (SA) for IP Security (IPSec)?
A. Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
B. Secure Key Exchange Mechanism
C. Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol
D. Oakley
Answer: A
Explanation:
Explanation/Reference:
The Key management for IPSec is called the Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
Note: IKE underwent a series of improvements establishing IKEv2 with RFC 4306. The basis of this answer is IKEv2.
The IKE protocol is a hybrid of three other protocols: ISAKMP (Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol), Oakley and SKEME. ISAKMP provides a framework for authentication and key exchange, but does not define them (neither authentication nor key exchange). The Oakley protocol describes a series of modes for key exchange and the SKEME protocol defines key exchange techniques.
IKE-Internet Key Exchange. A hybrid protocol that implements Oakley and Skeme key exchanges inside the ISAKMP framework. IKE can be used with other protocols, but its initial implementation is with the IPSec protocol. IKE provides authentication of the IPSec peers, negotiates IPSec keys, and negotiates IPSec security associations.
IKE is implemented in accordance with RFC 2409, The Internet Key Exchange.
The Internet Key Exchange (IKE) security protocol is a key management protocol standard that is used in conjunction with the IPSec standard. IPSec can be configured without IKE, but IKE enhances IPSec by providing additional features, flexibility, and ease of configuration for the IPSec standard.
IKE is a hybrid protocol that implements the Oakley key exchange and the SKEME key exchange inside the Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) framework. (ISAKMP, Oakley, and SKEME are security protocols implemented by IKE.)
IKE automatically negotiates IPSec security associations (SAs) and enables IPSec secure communications without costly manual preconfiguration. Specifically, IKE provides these benefits:
*Eliminates the need to manually specify all the IPSec security parameters in the crypto maps at both peers.
*Allows you to specify a lifetime for the IPSec security association.
*Allows encryption keys to change during IPSec sessions.
*Allows IPSec to provide anti-replay services.
*Permits certification authority (CA) support for a manageable, scalable IPSec implementation.
*Allows dynamic authentication of peers.
About ISAKMP
The Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) is a framework that defines the phases for establishing a secure relationship and support for negotiation of security attributes, it does not establish sessions keys by itself, it is used along with the Oakley session key establishment protocol. The Secure Key Exchange Mechanism (SKEME) describes a secure exchange mechanism and Oakley defines the modes of operation needed to establish a secure connection.
ISAKMP provides a framework for Internet key management and provides the specific protocol support for negotiation of security attributes. Alone, it does not establish session keys. However it can be used with various session key establishment protocols, such as Oakley, to provide a complete solution to Internet key management.
About Oakley
The Oakley protocol uses a hybrid Diffie-Hellman technique to establish session keys on Internet hosts and routers. Oakley provides the important security property of Perfect Forward Secrecy (PFS) and is based on cryptographic techniques that have survived substantial public scrutiny. Oakley can be used by itself, if no attribute negotiation is needed, or Oakley can be used in conjunction with ISAKMP. When ISAKMP is used with Oakley, key escrow is not feasible.
The ISAKMP and Oakley protocols have been combined into a hybrid protocol. The resolution of ISAKMP with Oakley uses the framework of ISAKMP to support a subset of Oakley key exchange modes. This new key exchange protocol provides optional PFS, full security association attribute negotiation, and authentication methods that provide both repudiation and non-repudiation. Implementations of this protocol can be used to establish VPNs and also allow for users from remote sites (who may have a dynamically allocated IP address) access to a secure network.
About IPSec
The IETF's IPSec Working Group develops standards for IP-layer security mechanisms for both IPv4 and IPv6. The group also is developing generic key management protocols for use on the Internet. For more information, refer to the IP Security and Encryption Overview.
IPSec is a framework of open standards developed by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) that provides security for transmission of sensitive information over unprotected networks such as the Internet.
It acts at the network level and implements the following standards:
IPSec
Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
Data Encryption Standard (DES)
MD5 (HMAC variant)
SHA (HMAC variant)
Authentication Header (AH)
Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP)
IPSec services provide a robust security solution that is standards-based. IPSec also provides data authentication and anti-replay services in addition to data confidentiality services.
For more information regarding IPSec, refer to the chapter "Configuring IPSec Network Security." About SKEME
SKEME constitutes a compact protocol that supports a variety of realistic scenarios and security models over Internet. It provides clear tradeoffs between security and performance as required by the different scenarios without incurring in unnecessary system complexity. The protocol supports key exchange based on public key, key distribution centers, or manual installation, and provides for fast and secure key refreshment. In addition, SKEME selectively provides perfect forward secrecy, allows for replaceability and negotiation of the underlying cryptographic primitives, and addresses privacy issues as anonymity and repudiatability
SKEME's basic mode is based on the use of public keys and a Diffie-Hellman shared secret generation.
However, SKEME is not restricted to the use of public keys, but also allows the use of a pre-shared key.
This key can be obtained by manual distribution or by the intermediary of a key distribution center (KDC) such as Kerberos.
In short, SKEME contains four distinct modes:
Basic mode, which provides a key exchange based on public keys and ensures PFS thanks to Diffie- Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of public keys, but without Diffie-Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of a pre-shared key and on Diffie-Hellman.
A mechanism of fast rekeying based only on symmetrical algorithms.
In addition, SKEME is composed of three phases: SHARE, EXCH and AUTH.
During the SHARE phase, the peers exchange half-keys, encrypted with their respective public keys.
These two half-keys are used to compute a secret key K. If anonymity is wanted, the identities of the two peers are also encrypted. If a shared secret already exists, this phase is skipped.
The exchange phase (EXCH) is used, depending on the selected mode, to exchange either Diffie- Hellman public values or nonces. The Diffie-Hellman shared secret will only be computed after the end of the exchanges.
The public values or nonces are authenticated during the authentication phase (AUTH), using the secret key established during the SHARE phase.
The messages from these three phases do not necessarily follow the order described above; in actual practice they are combined to minimize the number of exchanged messages.
References used for this question:
Source: KRUTZ, Ronald L. & VINES, Russel D., The CISSP Prep Guide: Mastering the Ten Domains of Computer Security, John Wiley & Sons, 2001, Chapter 4: Cryptography (page 172).
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4306
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4301
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_Key_Exchange
CISCO ISAKMP and OAKLEY information
CISCO Configuring Internet Key Exchange Protocol
http://www.hsc.fr/ressources/articles/ipsec-tech/index.html.en

NEW QUESTION: 4
A customer must perform trend analysis for future growth. Which product should be included in the design?
A. IBM System Director
B. IBM Tivoli Performance Analyzer
C. IBM Tivoli Monitoring Agent Builder
D. IBM Tivoli Common Reporting
Answer: B

PDF questions and ' marker.Nexus-5548-B(config)#
A. The vPC domain has already been configured
B. The vPC links have to be configured before the vPC domain can be added
C. vPC domain cannot be configured at the global prompt
D. Have not yet turned on the vpc feature using the 'feature vpc' command
Answer: D

NEW QUESTION: 3
What is the name of the protocol use to set up and manage Security Associations (SA) for IP Security (IPSec)?
A. Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
B. Secure Key Exchange Mechanism
C. Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol
D. Oakley
Answer: A
Explanation:
Explanation/Reference:
The Key management for IPSec is called the Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
Note: IKE underwent a series of improvements establishing IKEv2 with RFC 4306. The basis of this answer is IKEv2.
The IKE protocol is a hybrid of three other protocols: ISAKMP (Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol), Oakley and SKEME. ISAKMP provides a framework for authentication and key exchange, but does not define them (neither authentication nor key exchange). The Oakley protocol describes a series of modes for key exchange and the SKEME protocol defines key exchange techniques.
IKE-Internet Key Exchange. A hybrid protocol that implements Oakley and Skeme key exchanges inside the ISAKMP framework. IKE can be used with other protocols, but its initial implementation is with the IPSec protocol. IKE provides authentication of the IPSec peers, negotiates IPSec keys, and negotiates IPSec security associations.
IKE is implemented in accordance with RFC 2409, The Internet Key Exchange.
The Internet Key Exchange (IKE) security protocol is a key management protocol standard that is used in conjunction with the IPSec standard. IPSec can be configured without IKE, but IKE enhances IPSec by providing additional features, flexibility, and ease of configuration for the IPSec standard.
IKE is a hybrid protocol that implements the Oakley key exchange and the SKEME key exchange inside the Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) framework. (ISAKMP, Oakley, and SKEME are security protocols implemented by IKE.)
IKE automatically negotiates IPSec security associations (SAs) and enables IPSec secure communications without costly manual preconfiguration. Specifically, IKE provides these benefits:
*Eliminates the need to manually specify all the IPSec security parameters in the crypto maps at both peers.
*Allows you to specify a lifetime for the IPSec security association.
*Allows encryption keys to change during IPSec sessions.
*Allows IPSec to provide anti-replay services.
*Permits certification authority (CA) support for a manageable, scalable IPSec implementation.
*Allows dynamic authentication of peers.
About ISAKMP
The Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) is a framework that defines the phases for establishing a secure relationship and support for negotiation of security attributes, it does not establish sessions keys by itself, it is used along with the Oakley session key establishment protocol. The Secure Key Exchange Mechanism (SKEME) describes a secure exchange mechanism and Oakley defines the modes of operation needed to establish a secure connection.
ISAKMP provides a framework for Internet key management and provides the specific protocol support for negotiation of security attributes. Alone, it does not establish session keys. However it can be used with various session key establishment protocols, such as Oakley, to provide a complete solution to Internet key management.
About Oakley
The Oakley protocol uses a hybrid Diffie-Hellman technique to establish session keys on Internet hosts and routers. Oakley provides the important security property of Perfect Forward Secrecy (PFS) and is based on cryptographic techniques that have survived substantial public scrutiny. Oakley can be used by itself, if no attribute negotiation is needed, or Oakley can be used in conjunction with ISAKMP. When ISAKMP is used with Oakley, key escrow is not feasible.
The ISAKMP and Oakley protocols have been combined into a hybrid protocol. The resolution of ISAKMP with Oakley uses the framework of ISAKMP to support a subset of Oakley key exchange modes. This new key exchange protocol provides optional PFS, full security association attribute negotiation, and authentication methods that provide both repudiation and non-repudiation. Implementations of this protocol can be used to establish VPNs and also allow for users from remote sites (who may have a dynamically allocated IP address) access to a secure network.
About IPSec
The IETF's IPSec Working Group develops standards for IP-layer security mechanisms for both IPv4 and IPv6. The group also is developing generic key management protocols for use on the Internet. For more information, refer to the IP Security and Encryption Overview.
IPSec is a framework of open standards developed by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) that provides security for transmission of sensitive information over unprotected networks such as the Internet.
It acts at the network level and implements the following standards:
IPSec
Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
Data Encryption Standard (DES)
MD5 (HMAC variant)
SHA (HMAC variant)
Authentication Header (AH)
Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP)
IPSec services provide a robust security solution that is standards-based. IPSec also provides data authentication and anti-replay services in addition to data confidentiality services.
For more information regarding IPSec, refer to the chapter "Configuring IPSec Network Security." About SKEME
SKEME constitutes a compact protocol that supports a variety of realistic scenarios and security models over Internet. It provides clear tradeoffs between security and performance as required by the different scenarios without incurring in unnecessary system complexity. The protocol supports key exchange based on public key, key distribution centers, or manual installation, and provides for fast and secure key refreshment. In addition, SKEME selectively provides perfect forward secrecy, allows for replaceability and negotiation of the underlying cryptographic primitives, and addresses privacy issues as anonymity and repudiatability
SKEME's basic mode is based on the use of public keys and a Diffie-Hellman shared secret generation.
However, SKEME is not restricted to the use of public keys, but also allows the use of a pre-shared key.
This key can be obtained by manual distribution or by the intermediary of a key distribution center (KDC) such as Kerberos.
In short, SKEME contains four distinct modes:
Basic mode, which provides a key exchange based on public keys and ensures PFS thanks to Diffie- Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of public keys, but without Diffie-Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of a pre-shared key and on Diffie-Hellman.
A mechanism of fast rekeying based only on symmetrical algorithms.
In addition, SKEME is composed of three phases: SHARE, EXCH and AUTH.
During the SHARE phase, the peers exchange half-keys, encrypted with their respective public keys.
These two half-keys are used to compute a secret key K. If anonymity is wanted, the identities of the two peers are also encrypted. If a shared secret already exists, this phase is skipped.
The exchange phase (EXCH) is used, depending on the selected mode, to exchange either Diffie- Hellman public values or nonces. The Diffie-Hellman shared secret will only be computed after the end of the exchanges.
The public values or nonces are authenticated during the authentication phase (AUTH), using the secret key established during the SHARE phase.
The messages from these three phases do not necessarily follow the order described above; in actual practice they are combined to minimize the number of exchanged messages.
References used for this question:
Source: KRUTZ, Ronald L. & VINES, Russel D., The CISSP Prep Guide: Mastering the Ten Domains of Computer Security, John Wiley & Sons, 2001, Chapter 4: Cryptography (page 172).
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4306
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4301
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_Key_Exchange
CISCO ISAKMP and OAKLEY information
CISCO Configuring Internet Key Exchange Protocol
http://www.hsc.fr/ressources/articles/ipsec-tech/index.html.en

NEW QUESTION: 4
A customer must perform trend analysis for future growth. Which product should be included in the design?
A. IBM System Director
B. IBM Tivoli Performance Analyzer
C. IBM Tivoli Monitoring Agent Builder
D. IBM Tivoli Common Reporting
Answer: B

practice test."> Buy H13-211_V1.0 ' marker.Nexus-5548-B(config)#<br /><strong>A.</strong> The vPC domain has already been configured<br /><strong>B.</strong> The vPC links have to be configured before the vPC domain can be added<br /><strong>C.</strong> vPC domain cannot be configured at the global prompt<br /><strong>D.</strong> Have not yet turned on the vpc feature using the 'feature vpc' command<br /><strong>Answer: D</strong><br /><br /></p><p><strong>NEW QUESTION: 3</strong><br />What is the name of the protocol use to set up and manage Security Associations (SA) for IP Security (IPSec)?<br /><strong>A.</strong> Internet Key Exchange (IKE)<br /><strong>B.</strong> Secure Key Exchange Mechanism<br /><strong>C.</strong> Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol<br /><strong>D.</strong> Oakley<br /><strong>Answer: A</strong><br />Explanation:<br />Explanation/Reference:<br />The Key management for IPSec is called the Internet Key Exchange (IKE)<br />Note: IKE underwent a series of improvements establishing IKEv2 with RFC 4306. The basis of this answer is IKEv2.<br />The IKE protocol is a hybrid of three other protocols: ISAKMP (Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol), Oakley and SKEME. ISAKMP provides a framework for authentication and key exchange, but does not define them (neither authentication nor key exchange). The Oakley protocol describes a series of modes for key exchange and the SKEME protocol defines key exchange techniques.<br />IKE-Internet Key Exchange. A hybrid protocol that implements Oakley and Skeme key exchanges inside the ISAKMP framework. IKE can be used with other protocols, but its initial implementation is with the IPSec protocol. IKE provides authentication of the IPSec peers, negotiates IPSec keys, and negotiates IPSec security associations.<br />IKE is implemented in accordance with RFC 2409, The Internet Key Exchange.<br />The Internet Key Exchange (IKE) security protocol is a key management protocol standard that is used in conjunction with the IPSec standard. IPSec can be configured without IKE, but IKE enhances IPSec by providing additional features, flexibility, and ease of configuration for the IPSec standard.<br />IKE is a hybrid protocol that implements the Oakley key exchange and the SKEME key exchange inside the Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) framework. (ISAKMP, Oakley, and SKEME are security protocols implemented by IKE.)<br />IKE automatically negotiates IPSec security associations (SAs) and enables IPSec secure communications without costly manual preconfiguration. Specifically, IKE provides these benefits:<br />*Eliminates the need to manually specify all the IPSec security parameters in the crypto maps at both peers.<br />*Allows you to specify a lifetime for the IPSec security association.<br />*Allows encryption keys to change during IPSec sessions.<br />*Allows IPSec to provide anti-replay services.<br />*Permits certification authority (CA) support for a manageable, scalable IPSec implementation.<br />*Allows dynamic authentication of peers.<br />About ISAKMP<br />The Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) is a framework that defines the phases for establishing a secure relationship and support for negotiation of security attributes, it does not establish sessions keys by itself, it is used along with the Oakley session key establishment protocol. The Secure Key Exchange Mechanism (SKEME) describes a secure exchange mechanism and Oakley defines the modes of operation needed to establish a secure connection.<br />ISAKMP provides a framework for Internet key management and provides the specific protocol support for negotiation of security attributes. Alone, it does not establish session keys. However it can be used with various session key establishment protocols, such as Oakley, to provide a complete solution to Internet key management.<br />About Oakley<br />The Oakley protocol uses a hybrid Diffie-Hellman technique to establish session keys on Internet hosts and routers. Oakley provides the important security property of Perfect Forward Secrecy (PFS) and is based on cryptographic techniques that have survived substantial public scrutiny. Oakley can be used by itself, if no attribute negotiation is needed, or Oakley can be used in conjunction with ISAKMP. When ISAKMP is used with Oakley, key escrow is not feasible.<br />The ISAKMP and Oakley protocols have been combined into a hybrid protocol. The resolution of ISAKMP with Oakley uses the framework of ISAKMP to support a subset of Oakley key exchange modes. This new key exchange protocol provides optional PFS, full security association attribute negotiation, and authentication methods that provide both repudiation and non-repudiation. Implementations of this protocol can be used to establish VPNs and also allow for users from remote sites (who may have a dynamically allocated IP address) access to a secure network.<br />About IPSec<br />The IETF's IPSec Working Group develops standards for IP-layer security mechanisms for both IPv4 and IPv6. The group also is developing generic key management protocols for use on the Internet. For more information, refer to the IP Security and Encryption Overview.<br />IPSec is a framework of open standards developed by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) that provides security for transmission of sensitive information over unprotected networks such as the Internet.<br />It acts at the network level and implements the following standards:<br />IPSec<br />Internet Key Exchange (IKE)<br />Data Encryption Standard (DES)<br />MD5 (HMAC variant)<br />SHA (HMAC variant)<br />Authentication Header (AH)<br />Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP)<br />IPSec services provide a robust security solution that is standards-based. IPSec also provides data authentication and anti-replay services in addition to data confidentiality services.<br />For more information regarding IPSec, refer to the chapter "Configuring IPSec Network Security." About SKEME<br />SKEME constitutes a compact protocol that supports a variety of realistic scenarios and security models over Internet. It provides clear tradeoffs between security and performance as required by the different scenarios without incurring in unnecessary system complexity. The protocol supports key exchange based on public key, key distribution centers, or manual installation, and provides for fast and secure key refreshment. In addition, SKEME selectively provides perfect forward secrecy, allows for replaceability and negotiation of the underlying cryptographic primitives, and addresses privacy issues as anonymity and repudiatability<br />SKEME's basic mode is based on the use of public keys and a Diffie-Hellman shared secret generation.<br />However, SKEME is not restricted to the use of public keys, but also allows the use of a pre-shared key.<br />This key can be obtained by manual distribution or by the intermediary of a key distribution center (KDC) such as Kerberos.<br />In short, SKEME contains four distinct modes:<br />Basic mode, which provides a key exchange based on public keys and ensures PFS thanks to Diffie- Hellman.<br />A key exchange based on the use of public keys, but without Diffie-Hellman.<br />A key exchange based on the use of a pre-shared key and on Diffie-Hellman.<br />A mechanism of fast rekeying based only on symmetrical algorithms.<br />In addition, SKEME is composed of three phases: SHARE, EXCH and AUTH.<br />During the SHARE phase, the peers exchange half-keys, encrypted with their respective public keys.<br />These two half-keys are used to compute a secret key K. If anonymity is wanted, the identities of the two peers are also encrypted. If a shared secret already exists, this phase is skipped.<br />The exchange phase (EXCH) is used, depending on the selected mode, to exchange either Diffie- Hellman public values or nonces. The Diffie-Hellman shared secret will only be computed after the end of the exchanges.<br />The public values or nonces are authenticated during the authentication phase (AUTH), using the secret key established during the SHARE phase.<br />The messages from these three phases do not necessarily follow the order described above; in actual practice they are combined to minimize the number of exchanged messages.<br />References used for this question:<br />Source: KRUTZ, Ronald L. & VINES, Russel D., The CISSP Prep Guide: Mastering the Ten Domains of Computer Security, John Wiley & Sons, 2001, Chapter 4: Cryptography (page 172).<br />http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4306<br />http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4301<br />http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_Key_Exchange<br />CISCO ISAKMP and OAKLEY information<br />CISCO Configuring Internet Key Exchange Protocol<br />http://www.hsc.fr/ressources/articles/ipsec-tech/index.html.en<br /><br /></p><p><strong>NEW QUESTION: 4</strong><br />A customer must perform trend analysis for future growth. Which product should be included in the design?<br /><strong>A.</strong> IBM System Director<br /><strong>B.</strong> IBM Tivoli Performance Analyzer<br /><strong>C.</strong> IBM Tivoli Monitoring Agent Builder<br /><strong>D.</strong> IBM Tivoli Common Reporting<br /><strong>Answer: B</strong><br /><br /></p> Dumps Questions

Huawei H13-211_V1.0 Best Vce - H13-211_V1.0 Valid Braindumps Pdf, H13-211_V1.0 Official Cert Guide - Championsgroup

Actual ' marker.Nexus-5548-B(config)#
A. The vPC domain has already been configured
B. The vPC links have to be configured before the vPC domain can be added
C. vPC domain cannot be configured at the global prompt
D. Have not yet turned on the vpc feature using the 'feature vpc' command
Answer: D

NEW QUESTION: 3
What is the name of the protocol use to set up and manage Security Associations (SA) for IP Security (IPSec)?
A. Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
B. Secure Key Exchange Mechanism
C. Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol
D. Oakley
Answer: A
Explanation:
Explanation/Reference:
The Key management for IPSec is called the Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
Note: IKE underwent a series of improvements establishing IKEv2 with RFC 4306. The basis of this answer is IKEv2.
The IKE protocol is a hybrid of three other protocols: ISAKMP (Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol), Oakley and SKEME. ISAKMP provides a framework for authentication and key exchange, but does not define them (neither authentication nor key exchange). The Oakley protocol describes a series of modes for key exchange and the SKEME protocol defines key exchange techniques.
IKE-Internet Key Exchange. A hybrid protocol that implements Oakley and Skeme key exchanges inside the ISAKMP framework. IKE can be used with other protocols, but its initial implementation is with the IPSec protocol. IKE provides authentication of the IPSec peers, negotiates IPSec keys, and negotiates IPSec security associations.
IKE is implemented in accordance with RFC 2409, The Internet Key Exchange.
The Internet Key Exchange (IKE) security protocol is a key management protocol standard that is used in conjunction with the IPSec standard. IPSec can be configured without IKE, but IKE enhances IPSec by providing additional features, flexibility, and ease of configuration for the IPSec standard.
IKE is a hybrid protocol that implements the Oakley key exchange and the SKEME key exchange inside the Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) framework. (ISAKMP, Oakley, and SKEME are security protocols implemented by IKE.)
IKE automatically negotiates IPSec security associations (SAs) and enables IPSec secure communications without costly manual preconfiguration. Specifically, IKE provides these benefits:
*Eliminates the need to manually specify all the IPSec security parameters in the crypto maps at both peers.
*Allows you to specify a lifetime for the IPSec security association.
*Allows encryption keys to change during IPSec sessions.
*Allows IPSec to provide anti-replay services.
*Permits certification authority (CA) support for a manageable, scalable IPSec implementation.
*Allows dynamic authentication of peers.
About ISAKMP
The Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) is a framework that defines the phases for establishing a secure relationship and support for negotiation of security attributes, it does not establish sessions keys by itself, it is used along with the Oakley session key establishment protocol. The Secure Key Exchange Mechanism (SKEME) describes a secure exchange mechanism and Oakley defines the modes of operation needed to establish a secure connection.
ISAKMP provides a framework for Internet key management and provides the specific protocol support for negotiation of security attributes. Alone, it does not establish session keys. However it can be used with various session key establishment protocols, such as Oakley, to provide a complete solution to Internet key management.
About Oakley
The Oakley protocol uses a hybrid Diffie-Hellman technique to establish session keys on Internet hosts and routers. Oakley provides the important security property of Perfect Forward Secrecy (PFS) and is based on cryptographic techniques that have survived substantial public scrutiny. Oakley can be used by itself, if no attribute negotiation is needed, or Oakley can be used in conjunction with ISAKMP. When ISAKMP is used with Oakley, key escrow is not feasible.
The ISAKMP and Oakley protocols have been combined into a hybrid protocol. The resolution of ISAKMP with Oakley uses the framework of ISAKMP to support a subset of Oakley key exchange modes. This new key exchange protocol provides optional PFS, full security association attribute negotiation, and authentication methods that provide both repudiation and non-repudiation. Implementations of this protocol can be used to establish VPNs and also allow for users from remote sites (who may have a dynamically allocated IP address) access to a secure network.
About IPSec
The IETF's IPSec Working Group develops standards for IP-layer security mechanisms for both IPv4 and IPv6. The group also is developing generic key management protocols for use on the Internet. For more information, refer to the IP Security and Encryption Overview.
IPSec is a framework of open standards developed by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) that provides security for transmission of sensitive information over unprotected networks such as the Internet.
It acts at the network level and implements the following standards:
IPSec
Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
Data Encryption Standard (DES)
MD5 (HMAC variant)
SHA (HMAC variant)
Authentication Header (AH)
Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP)
IPSec services provide a robust security solution that is standards-based. IPSec also provides data authentication and anti-replay services in addition to data confidentiality services.
For more information regarding IPSec, refer to the chapter "Configuring IPSec Network Security." About SKEME
SKEME constitutes a compact protocol that supports a variety of realistic scenarios and security models over Internet. It provides clear tradeoffs between security and performance as required by the different scenarios without incurring in unnecessary system complexity. The protocol supports key exchange based on public key, key distribution centers, or manual installation, and provides for fast and secure key refreshment. In addition, SKEME selectively provides perfect forward secrecy, allows for replaceability and negotiation of the underlying cryptographic primitives, and addresses privacy issues as anonymity and repudiatability
SKEME's basic mode is based on the use of public keys and a Diffie-Hellman shared secret generation.
However, SKEME is not restricted to the use of public keys, but also allows the use of a pre-shared key.
This key can be obtained by manual distribution or by the intermediary of a key distribution center (KDC) such as Kerberos.
In short, SKEME contains four distinct modes:
Basic mode, which provides a key exchange based on public keys and ensures PFS thanks to Diffie- Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of public keys, but without Diffie-Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of a pre-shared key and on Diffie-Hellman.
A mechanism of fast rekeying based only on symmetrical algorithms.
In addition, SKEME is composed of three phases: SHARE, EXCH and AUTH.
During the SHARE phase, the peers exchange half-keys, encrypted with their respective public keys.
These two half-keys are used to compute a secret key K. If anonymity is wanted, the identities of the two peers are also encrypted. If a shared secret already exists, this phase is skipped.
The exchange phase (EXCH) is used, depending on the selected mode, to exchange either Diffie- Hellman public values or nonces. The Diffie-Hellman shared secret will only be computed after the end of the exchanges.
The public values or nonces are authenticated during the authentication phase (AUTH), using the secret key established during the SHARE phase.
The messages from these three phases do not necessarily follow the order described above; in actual practice they are combined to minimize the number of exchanged messages.
References used for this question:
Source: KRUTZ, Ronald L. & VINES, Russel D., The CISSP Prep Guide: Mastering the Ten Domains of Computer Security, John Wiley & Sons, 2001, Chapter 4: Cryptography (page 172).
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4306
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4301
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_Key_Exchange
CISCO ISAKMP and OAKLEY information
CISCO Configuring Internet Key Exchange Protocol
http://www.hsc.fr/ressources/articles/ipsec-tech/index.html.en

NEW QUESTION: 4
A customer must perform trend analysis for future growth. Which product should be included in the design?
A. IBM System Director
B. IBM Tivoli Performance Analyzer
C. IBM Tivoli Monitoring Agent Builder
D. IBM Tivoli Common Reporting
Answer: B

Dumps PDF for Exam Success by Experts

Exam Code: ' marker.Nexus-5548-B(config)#
A. The vPC domain has already been configured
B. The vPC links have to be configured before the vPC domain can be added
C. vPC domain cannot be configured at the global prompt
D. Have not yet turned on the vpc feature using the 'feature vpc' command
Answer: D

NEW QUESTION: 3
What is the name of the protocol use to set up and manage Security Associations (SA) for IP Security (IPSec)?
A. Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
B. Secure Key Exchange Mechanism
C. Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol
D. Oakley
Answer: A
Explanation:
Explanation/Reference:
The Key management for IPSec is called the Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
Note: IKE underwent a series of improvements establishing IKEv2 with RFC 4306. The basis of this answer is IKEv2.
The IKE protocol is a hybrid of three other protocols: ISAKMP (Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol), Oakley and SKEME. ISAKMP provides a framework for authentication and key exchange, but does not define them (neither authentication nor key exchange). The Oakley protocol describes a series of modes for key exchange and the SKEME protocol defines key exchange techniques.
IKE-Internet Key Exchange. A hybrid protocol that implements Oakley and Skeme key exchanges inside the ISAKMP framework. IKE can be used with other protocols, but its initial implementation is with the IPSec protocol. IKE provides authentication of the IPSec peers, negotiates IPSec keys, and negotiates IPSec security associations.
IKE is implemented in accordance with RFC 2409, The Internet Key Exchange.
The Internet Key Exchange (IKE) security protocol is a key management protocol standard that is used in conjunction with the IPSec standard. IPSec can be configured without IKE, but IKE enhances IPSec by providing additional features, flexibility, and ease of configuration for the IPSec standard.
IKE is a hybrid protocol that implements the Oakley key exchange and the SKEME key exchange inside the Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) framework. (ISAKMP, Oakley, and SKEME are security protocols implemented by IKE.)
IKE automatically negotiates IPSec security associations (SAs) and enables IPSec secure communications without costly manual preconfiguration. Specifically, IKE provides these benefits:
*Eliminates the need to manually specify all the IPSec security parameters in the crypto maps at both peers.
*Allows you to specify a lifetime for the IPSec security association.
*Allows encryption keys to change during IPSec sessions.
*Allows IPSec to provide anti-replay services.
*Permits certification authority (CA) support for a manageable, scalable IPSec implementation.
*Allows dynamic authentication of peers.
About ISAKMP
The Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) is a framework that defines the phases for establishing a secure relationship and support for negotiation of security attributes, it does not establish sessions keys by itself, it is used along with the Oakley session key establishment protocol. The Secure Key Exchange Mechanism (SKEME) describes a secure exchange mechanism and Oakley defines the modes of operation needed to establish a secure connection.
ISAKMP provides a framework for Internet key management and provides the specific protocol support for negotiation of security attributes. Alone, it does not establish session keys. However it can be used with various session key establishment protocols, such as Oakley, to provide a complete solution to Internet key management.
About Oakley
The Oakley protocol uses a hybrid Diffie-Hellman technique to establish session keys on Internet hosts and routers. Oakley provides the important security property of Perfect Forward Secrecy (PFS) and is based on cryptographic techniques that have survived substantial public scrutiny. Oakley can be used by itself, if no attribute negotiation is needed, or Oakley can be used in conjunction with ISAKMP. When ISAKMP is used with Oakley, key escrow is not feasible.
The ISAKMP and Oakley protocols have been combined into a hybrid protocol. The resolution of ISAKMP with Oakley uses the framework of ISAKMP to support a subset of Oakley key exchange modes. This new key exchange protocol provides optional PFS, full security association attribute negotiation, and authentication methods that provide both repudiation and non-repudiation. Implementations of this protocol can be used to establish VPNs and also allow for users from remote sites (who may have a dynamically allocated IP address) access to a secure network.
About IPSec
The IETF's IPSec Working Group develops standards for IP-layer security mechanisms for both IPv4 and IPv6. The group also is developing generic key management protocols for use on the Internet. For more information, refer to the IP Security and Encryption Overview.
IPSec is a framework of open standards developed by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) that provides security for transmission of sensitive information over unprotected networks such as the Internet.
It acts at the network level and implements the following standards:
IPSec
Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
Data Encryption Standard (DES)
MD5 (HMAC variant)
SHA (HMAC variant)
Authentication Header (AH)
Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP)
IPSec services provide a robust security solution that is standards-based. IPSec also provides data authentication and anti-replay services in addition to data confidentiality services.
For more information regarding IPSec, refer to the chapter "Configuring IPSec Network Security." About SKEME
SKEME constitutes a compact protocol that supports a variety of realistic scenarios and security models over Internet. It provides clear tradeoffs between security and performance as required by the different scenarios without incurring in unnecessary system complexity. The protocol supports key exchange based on public key, key distribution centers, or manual installation, and provides for fast and secure key refreshment. In addition, SKEME selectively provides perfect forward secrecy, allows for replaceability and negotiation of the underlying cryptographic primitives, and addresses privacy issues as anonymity and repudiatability
SKEME's basic mode is based on the use of public keys and a Diffie-Hellman shared secret generation.
However, SKEME is not restricted to the use of public keys, but also allows the use of a pre-shared key.
This key can be obtained by manual distribution or by the intermediary of a key distribution center (KDC) such as Kerberos.
In short, SKEME contains four distinct modes:
Basic mode, which provides a key exchange based on public keys and ensures PFS thanks to Diffie- Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of public keys, but without Diffie-Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of a pre-shared key and on Diffie-Hellman.
A mechanism of fast rekeying based only on symmetrical algorithms.
In addition, SKEME is composed of three phases: SHARE, EXCH and AUTH.
During the SHARE phase, the peers exchange half-keys, encrypted with their respective public keys.
These two half-keys are used to compute a secret key K. If anonymity is wanted, the identities of the two peers are also encrypted. If a shared secret already exists, this phase is skipped.
The exchange phase (EXCH) is used, depending on the selected mode, to exchange either Diffie- Hellman public values or nonces. The Diffie-Hellman shared secret will only be computed after the end of the exchanges.
The public values or nonces are authenticated during the authentication phase (AUTH), using the secret key established during the SHARE phase.
The messages from these three phases do not necessarily follow the order described above; in actual practice they are combined to minimize the number of exchanged messages.
References used for this question:
Source: KRUTZ, Ronald L. & VINES, Russel D., The CISSP Prep Guide: Mastering the Ten Domains of Computer Security, John Wiley & Sons, 2001, Chapter 4: Cryptography (page 172).
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4306
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4301
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_Key_Exchange
CISCO ISAKMP and OAKLEY information
CISCO Configuring Internet Key Exchange Protocol
http://www.hsc.fr/ressources/articles/ipsec-tech/index.html.en

NEW QUESTION: 4
A customer must perform trend analysis for future growth. Which product should be included in the design?
A. IBM System Director
B. IBM Tivoli Performance Analyzer
C. IBM Tivoli Monitoring Agent Builder
D. IBM Tivoli Common Reporting
Answer: B

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Certification Provider: H13-211_V1.0

Related Certification:

' marker.Nexus-5548-B(config)#<br /><strong>A.</strong> The vPC domain has already been configured<br /><strong>B.</strong> The vPC links have to be configured before the vPC domain can be added<br /><strong>C.</strong> vPC domain cannot be configured at the global prompt<br /><strong>D.</strong> Have not yet turned on the vpc feature using the 'feature vpc' command<br /><strong>Answer: D</strong><br /><br /></p><p><strong>NEW QUESTION: 3</strong><br />What is the name of the protocol use to set up and manage Security Associations (SA) for IP Security (IPSec)?<br /><strong>A.</strong> Internet Key Exchange (IKE)<br /><strong>B.</strong> Secure Key Exchange Mechanism<br /><strong>C.</strong> Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol<br /><strong>D.</strong> Oakley<br /><strong>Answer: A</strong><br />Explanation:<br />Explanation/Reference:<br />The Key management for IPSec is called the Internet Key Exchange (IKE)<br />Note: IKE underwent a series of improvements establishing IKEv2 with RFC 4306. The basis of this answer is IKEv2.<br />The IKE protocol is a hybrid of three other protocols: ISAKMP (Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol), Oakley and SKEME. ISAKMP provides a framework for authentication and key exchange, but does not define them (neither authentication nor key exchange). The Oakley protocol describes a series of modes for key exchange and the SKEME protocol defines key exchange techniques.<br />IKE-Internet Key Exchange. A hybrid protocol that implements Oakley and Skeme key exchanges inside the ISAKMP framework. IKE can be used with other protocols, but its initial implementation is with the IPSec protocol. IKE provides authentication of the IPSec peers, negotiates IPSec keys, and negotiates IPSec security associations.<br />IKE is implemented in accordance with RFC 2409, The Internet Key Exchange.<br />The Internet Key Exchange (IKE) security protocol is a key management protocol standard that is used in conjunction with the IPSec standard. IPSec can be configured without IKE, but IKE enhances IPSec by providing additional features, flexibility, and ease of configuration for the IPSec standard.<br />IKE is a hybrid protocol that implements the Oakley key exchange and the SKEME key exchange inside the Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) framework. (ISAKMP, Oakley, and SKEME are security protocols implemented by IKE.)<br />IKE automatically negotiates IPSec security associations (SAs) and enables IPSec secure communications without costly manual preconfiguration. Specifically, IKE provides these benefits:<br />*Eliminates the need to manually specify all the IPSec security parameters in the crypto maps at both peers.<br />*Allows you to specify a lifetime for the IPSec security association.<br />*Allows encryption keys to change during IPSec sessions.<br />*Allows IPSec to provide anti-replay services.<br />*Permits certification authority (CA) support for a manageable, scalable IPSec implementation.<br />*Allows dynamic authentication of peers.<br />About ISAKMP<br />The Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) is a framework that defines the phases for establishing a secure relationship and support for negotiation of security attributes, it does not establish sessions keys by itself, it is used along with the Oakley session key establishment protocol. The Secure Key Exchange Mechanism (SKEME) describes a secure exchange mechanism and Oakley defines the modes of operation needed to establish a secure connection.<br />ISAKMP provides a framework for Internet key management and provides the specific protocol support for negotiation of security attributes. Alone, it does not establish session keys. However it can be used with various session key establishment protocols, such as Oakley, to provide a complete solution to Internet key management.<br />About Oakley<br />The Oakley protocol uses a hybrid Diffie-Hellman technique to establish session keys on Internet hosts and routers. Oakley provides the important security property of Perfect Forward Secrecy (PFS) and is based on cryptographic techniques that have survived substantial public scrutiny. Oakley can be used by itself, if no attribute negotiation is needed, or Oakley can be used in conjunction with ISAKMP. When ISAKMP is used with Oakley, key escrow is not feasible.<br />The ISAKMP and Oakley protocols have been combined into a hybrid protocol. The resolution of ISAKMP with Oakley uses the framework of ISAKMP to support a subset of Oakley key exchange modes. This new key exchange protocol provides optional PFS, full security association attribute negotiation, and authentication methods that provide both repudiation and non-repudiation. Implementations of this protocol can be used to establish VPNs and also allow for users from remote sites (who may have a dynamically allocated IP address) access to a secure network.<br />About IPSec<br />The IETF's IPSec Working Group develops standards for IP-layer security mechanisms for both IPv4 and IPv6. The group also is developing generic key management protocols for use on the Internet. For more information, refer to the IP Security and Encryption Overview.<br />IPSec is a framework of open standards developed by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) that provides security for transmission of sensitive information over unprotected networks such as the Internet.<br />It acts at the network level and implements the following standards:<br />IPSec<br />Internet Key Exchange (IKE)<br />Data Encryption Standard (DES)<br />MD5 (HMAC variant)<br />SHA (HMAC variant)<br />Authentication Header (AH)<br />Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP)<br />IPSec services provide a robust security solution that is standards-based. IPSec also provides data authentication and anti-replay services in addition to data confidentiality services.<br />For more information regarding IPSec, refer to the chapter SKEME constitutes a compact protocol that supports a variety of realistic scenarios and security models over Internet. It provides clear tradeoffs between security and performance as required by the different scenarios without incurring in unnecessary system complexity. The protocol supports key exchange based on public key, key distribution centers, or manual installation, and provides for fast and secure key refreshment. In addition, SKEME selectively provides perfect forward secrecy, allows for replaceability and negotiation of the underlying cryptographic primitives, and addresses privacy issues as anonymity and repudiatability
SKEME's basic mode is based on the use of public keys and a Diffie-Hellman shared secret generation.
However, SKEME is not restricted to the use of public keys, but also allows the use of a pre-shared key.
This key can be obtained by manual distribution or by the intermediary of a key distribution center (KDC) such as Kerberos.
In short, SKEME contains four distinct modes:
Basic mode, which provides a key exchange based on public keys and ensures PFS thanks to Diffie- Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of public keys, but without Diffie-Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of a pre-shared key and on Diffie-Hellman.
A mechanism of fast rekeying based only on symmetrical algorithms.
In addition, SKEME is composed of three phases: SHARE, EXCH and AUTH.
During the SHARE phase, the peers exchange half-keys, encrypted with their respective public keys.
These two half-keys are used to compute a secret key K. If anonymity is wanted, the identities of the two peers are also encrypted. If a shared secret already exists, this phase is skipped.
The exchange phase (EXCH) is used, depending on the selected mode, to exchange either Diffie- Hellman public values or nonces. The Diffie-Hellman shared secret will only be computed after the end of the exchanges.
The public values or nonces are authenticated during the authentication phase (AUTH), using the secret key established during the SHARE phase.
The messages from these three phases do not necessarily follow the order described above; in actual practice they are combined to minimize the number of exchanged messages.
References used for this question:
Source: KRUTZ, Ronald L. & VINES, Russel D., The CISSP Prep Guide: Mastering the Ten Domains of Computer Security, John Wiley & Sons, 2001, Chapter 4: Cryptography (page 172).
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4306
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4301
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_Key_Exchange
CISCO ISAKMP and OAKLEY information
CISCO Configuring Internet Key Exchange Protocol
http://www.hsc.fr/ressources/articles/ipsec-tech/index.html.en

NEW QUESTION: 4
A customer must perform trend analysis for future growth. Which product should be included in the design?
A. IBM System Director
B. IBM Tivoli Performance Analyzer
C. IBM Tivoli Monitoring Agent Builder
D. IBM Tivoli Common Reporting
Answer: B

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Get Rid Of H13-211_V1.0 ' marker.Nexus-5548-B(config)#
A. The vPC domain has already been configured
B. The vPC links have to be configured before the vPC domain can be added
C. vPC domain cannot be configured at the global prompt
D. Have not yet turned on the vpc feature using the 'feature vpc' command
Answer: D

NEW QUESTION: 3
What is the name of the protocol use to set up and manage Security Associations (SA) for IP Security (IPSec)?
A. Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
B. Secure Key Exchange Mechanism
C. Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol
D. Oakley
Answer: A
Explanation:
Explanation/Reference:
The Key management for IPSec is called the Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
Note: IKE underwent a series of improvements establishing IKEv2 with RFC 4306. The basis of this answer is IKEv2.
The IKE protocol is a hybrid of three other protocols: ISAKMP (Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol), Oakley and SKEME. ISAKMP provides a framework for authentication and key exchange, but does not define them (neither authentication nor key exchange). The Oakley protocol describes a series of modes for key exchange and the SKEME protocol defines key exchange techniques.
IKE-Internet Key Exchange. A hybrid protocol that implements Oakley and Skeme key exchanges inside the ISAKMP framework. IKE can be used with other protocols, but its initial implementation is with the IPSec protocol. IKE provides authentication of the IPSec peers, negotiates IPSec keys, and negotiates IPSec security associations.
IKE is implemented in accordance with RFC 2409, The Internet Key Exchange.
The Internet Key Exchange (IKE) security protocol is a key management protocol standard that is used in conjunction with the IPSec standard. IPSec can be configured without IKE, but IKE enhances IPSec by providing additional features, flexibility, and ease of configuration for the IPSec standard.
IKE is a hybrid protocol that implements the Oakley key exchange and the SKEME key exchange inside the Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) framework. (ISAKMP, Oakley, and SKEME are security protocols implemented by IKE.)
IKE automatically negotiates IPSec security associations (SAs) and enables IPSec secure communications without costly manual preconfiguration. Specifically, IKE provides these benefits:
*Eliminates the need to manually specify all the IPSec security parameters in the crypto maps at both peers.
*Allows you to specify a lifetime for the IPSec security association.
*Allows encryption keys to change during IPSec sessions.
*Allows IPSec to provide anti-replay services.
*Permits certification authority (CA) support for a manageable, scalable IPSec implementation.
*Allows dynamic authentication of peers.
About ISAKMP
The Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) is a framework that defines the phases for establishing a secure relationship and support for negotiation of security attributes, it does not establish sessions keys by itself, it is used along with the Oakley session key establishment protocol. The Secure Key Exchange Mechanism (SKEME) describes a secure exchange mechanism and Oakley defines the modes of operation needed to establish a secure connection.
ISAKMP provides a framework for Internet key management and provides the specific protocol support for negotiation of security attributes. Alone, it does not establish session keys. However it can be used with various session key establishment protocols, such as Oakley, to provide a complete solution to Internet key management.
About Oakley
The Oakley protocol uses a hybrid Diffie-Hellman technique to establish session keys on Internet hosts and routers. Oakley provides the important security property of Perfect Forward Secrecy (PFS) and is based on cryptographic techniques that have survived substantial public scrutiny. Oakley can be used by itself, if no attribute negotiation is needed, or Oakley can be used in conjunction with ISAKMP. When ISAKMP is used with Oakley, key escrow is not feasible.
The ISAKMP and Oakley protocols have been combined into a hybrid protocol. The resolution of ISAKMP with Oakley uses the framework of ISAKMP to support a subset of Oakley key exchange modes. This new key exchange protocol provides optional PFS, full security association attribute negotiation, and authentication methods that provide both repudiation and non-repudiation. Implementations of this protocol can be used to establish VPNs and also allow for users from remote sites (who may have a dynamically allocated IP address) access to a secure network.
About IPSec
The IETF's IPSec Working Group develops standards for IP-layer security mechanisms for both IPv4 and IPv6. The group also is developing generic key management protocols for use on the Internet. For more information, refer to the IP Security and Encryption Overview.
IPSec is a framework of open standards developed by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) that provides security for transmission of sensitive information over unprotected networks such as the Internet.
It acts at the network level and implements the following standards:
IPSec
Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
Data Encryption Standard (DES)
MD5 (HMAC variant)
SHA (HMAC variant)
Authentication Header (AH)
Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP)
IPSec services provide a robust security solution that is standards-based. IPSec also provides data authentication and anti-replay services in addition to data confidentiality services.
For more information regarding IPSec, refer to the chapter "Configuring IPSec Network Security." About SKEME
SKEME constitutes a compact protocol that supports a variety of realistic scenarios and security models over Internet. It provides clear tradeoffs between security and performance as required by the different scenarios without incurring in unnecessary system complexity. The protocol supports key exchange based on public key, key distribution centers, or manual installation, and provides for fast and secure key refreshment. In addition, SKEME selectively provides perfect forward secrecy, allows for replaceability and negotiation of the underlying cryptographic primitives, and addresses privacy issues as anonymity and repudiatability
SKEME's basic mode is based on the use of public keys and a Diffie-Hellman shared secret generation.
However, SKEME is not restricted to the use of public keys, but also allows the use of a pre-shared key.
This key can be obtained by manual distribution or by the intermediary of a key distribution center (KDC) such as Kerberos.
In short, SKEME contains four distinct modes:
Basic mode, which provides a key exchange based on public keys and ensures PFS thanks to Diffie- Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of public keys, but without Diffie-Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of a pre-shared key and on Diffie-Hellman.
A mechanism of fast rekeying based only on symmetrical algorithms.
In addition, SKEME is composed of three phases: SHARE, EXCH and AUTH.
During the SHARE phase, the peers exchange half-keys, encrypted with their respective public keys.
These two half-keys are used to compute a secret key K. If anonymity is wanted, the identities of the two peers are also encrypted. If a shared secret already exists, this phase is skipped.
The exchange phase (EXCH) is used, depending on the selected mode, to exchange either Diffie- Hellman public values or nonces. The Diffie-Hellman shared secret will only be computed after the end of the exchanges.
The public values or nonces are authenticated during the authentication phase (AUTH), using the secret key established during the SHARE phase.
The messages from these three phases do not necessarily follow the order described above; in actual practice they are combined to minimize the number of exchanged messages.
References used for this question:
Source: KRUTZ, Ronald L. & VINES, Russel D., The CISSP Prep Guide: Mastering the Ten Domains of Computer Security, John Wiley & Sons, 2001, Chapter 4: Cryptography (page 172).
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4306
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4301
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_Key_Exchange
CISCO ISAKMP and OAKLEY information
CISCO Configuring Internet Key Exchange Protocol
http://www.hsc.fr/ressources/articles/ipsec-tech/index.html.en

NEW QUESTION: 4
A customer must perform trend analysis for future growth. Which product should be included in the design?
A. IBM System Director
B. IBM Tivoli Performance Analyzer
C. IBM Tivoli Monitoring Agent Builder
D. IBM Tivoli Common Reporting
Answer: B

Exam Anxiety and be Confident while Preparing From The Material We Provide You

Preparation of the H13-211_V1.0 ' marker.Nexus-5548-B(config)#
A. The vPC domain has already been configured
B. The vPC links have to be configured before the vPC domain can be added
C. vPC domain cannot be configured at the global prompt
D. Have not yet turned on the vpc feature using the 'feature vpc' command
Answer: D

NEW QUESTION: 3
What is the name of the protocol use to set up and manage Security Associations (SA) for IP Security (IPSec)?
A. Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
B. Secure Key Exchange Mechanism
C. Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol
D. Oakley
Answer: A
Explanation:
Explanation/Reference:
The Key management for IPSec is called the Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
Note: IKE underwent a series of improvements establishing IKEv2 with RFC 4306. The basis of this answer is IKEv2.
The IKE protocol is a hybrid of three other protocols: ISAKMP (Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol), Oakley and SKEME. ISAKMP provides a framework for authentication and key exchange, but does not define them (neither authentication nor key exchange). The Oakley protocol describes a series of modes for key exchange and the SKEME protocol defines key exchange techniques.
IKE-Internet Key Exchange. A hybrid protocol that implements Oakley and Skeme key exchanges inside the ISAKMP framework. IKE can be used with other protocols, but its initial implementation is with the IPSec protocol. IKE provides authentication of the IPSec peers, negotiates IPSec keys, and negotiates IPSec security associations.
IKE is implemented in accordance with RFC 2409, The Internet Key Exchange.
The Internet Key Exchange (IKE) security protocol is a key management protocol standard that is used in conjunction with the IPSec standard. IPSec can be configured without IKE, but IKE enhances IPSec by providing additional features, flexibility, and ease of configuration for the IPSec standard.
IKE is a hybrid protocol that implements the Oakley key exchange and the SKEME key exchange inside the Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) framework. (ISAKMP, Oakley, and SKEME are security protocols implemented by IKE.)
IKE automatically negotiates IPSec security associations (SAs) and enables IPSec secure communications without costly manual preconfiguration. Specifically, IKE provides these benefits:
*Eliminates the need to manually specify all the IPSec security parameters in the crypto maps at both peers.
*Allows you to specify a lifetime for the IPSec security association.
*Allows encryption keys to change during IPSec sessions.
*Allows IPSec to provide anti-replay services.
*Permits certification authority (CA) support for a manageable, scalable IPSec implementation.
*Allows dynamic authentication of peers.
About ISAKMP
The Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) is a framework that defines the phases for establishing a secure relationship and support for negotiation of security attributes, it does not establish sessions keys by itself, it is used along with the Oakley session key establishment protocol. The Secure Key Exchange Mechanism (SKEME) describes a secure exchange mechanism and Oakley defines the modes of operation needed to establish a secure connection.
ISAKMP provides a framework for Internet key management and provides the specific protocol support for negotiation of security attributes. Alone, it does not establish session keys. However it can be used with various session key establishment protocols, such as Oakley, to provide a complete solution to Internet key management.
About Oakley
The Oakley protocol uses a hybrid Diffie-Hellman technique to establish session keys on Internet hosts and routers. Oakley provides the important security property of Perfect Forward Secrecy (PFS) and is based on cryptographic techniques that have survived substantial public scrutiny. Oakley can be used by itself, if no attribute negotiation is needed, or Oakley can be used in conjunction with ISAKMP. When ISAKMP is used with Oakley, key escrow is not feasible.
The ISAKMP and Oakley protocols have been combined into a hybrid protocol. The resolution of ISAKMP with Oakley uses the framework of ISAKMP to support a subset of Oakley key exchange modes. This new key exchange protocol provides optional PFS, full security association attribute negotiation, and authentication methods that provide both repudiation and non-repudiation. Implementations of this protocol can be used to establish VPNs and also allow for users from remote sites (who may have a dynamically allocated IP address) access to a secure network.
About IPSec
The IETF's IPSec Working Group develops standards for IP-layer security mechanisms for both IPv4 and IPv6. The group also is developing generic key management protocols for use on the Internet. For more information, refer to the IP Security and Encryption Overview.
IPSec is a framework of open standards developed by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) that provides security for transmission of sensitive information over unprotected networks such as the Internet.
It acts at the network level and implements the following standards:
IPSec
Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
Data Encryption Standard (DES)
MD5 (HMAC variant)
SHA (HMAC variant)
Authentication Header (AH)
Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP)
IPSec services provide a robust security solution that is standards-based. IPSec also provides data authentication and anti-replay services in addition to data confidentiality services.
For more information regarding IPSec, refer to the chapter "Configuring IPSec Network Security." About SKEME
SKEME constitutes a compact protocol that supports a variety of realistic scenarios and security models over Internet. It provides clear tradeoffs between security and performance as required by the different scenarios without incurring in unnecessary system complexity. The protocol supports key exchange based on public key, key distribution centers, or manual installation, and provides for fast and secure key refreshment. In addition, SKEME selectively provides perfect forward secrecy, allows for replaceability and negotiation of the underlying cryptographic primitives, and addresses privacy issues as anonymity and repudiatability
SKEME's basic mode is based on the use of public keys and a Diffie-Hellman shared secret generation.
However, SKEME is not restricted to the use of public keys, but also allows the use of a pre-shared key.
This key can be obtained by manual distribution or by the intermediary of a key distribution center (KDC) such as Kerberos.
In short, SKEME contains four distinct modes:
Basic mode, which provides a key exchange based on public keys and ensures PFS thanks to Diffie- Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of public keys, but without Diffie-Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of a pre-shared key and on Diffie-Hellman.
A mechanism of fast rekeying based only on symmetrical algorithms.
In addition, SKEME is composed of three phases: SHARE, EXCH and AUTH.
During the SHARE phase, the peers exchange half-keys, encrypted with their respective public keys.
These two half-keys are used to compute a secret key K. If anonymity is wanted, the identities of the two peers are also encrypted. If a shared secret already exists, this phase is skipped.
The exchange phase (EXCH) is used, depending on the selected mode, to exchange either Diffie- Hellman public values or nonces. The Diffie-Hellman shared secret will only be computed after the end of the exchanges.
The public values or nonces are authenticated during the authentication phase (AUTH), using the secret key established during the SHARE phase.
The messages from these three phases do not necessarily follow the order described above; in actual practice they are combined to minimize the number of exchanged messages.
References used for this question:
Source: KRUTZ, Ronald L. & VINES, Russel D., The CISSP Prep Guide: Mastering the Ten Domains of Computer Security, John Wiley & Sons, 2001, Chapter 4: Cryptography (page 172).
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4306
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4301
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_Key_Exchange
CISCO ISAKMP and OAKLEY information
CISCO Configuring Internet Key Exchange Protocol
http://www.hsc.fr/ressources/articles/ipsec-tech/index.html.en

NEW QUESTION: 4
A customer must perform trend analysis for future growth. Which product should be included in the design?
A. IBM System Director
B. IBM Tivoli Performance Analyzer
C. IBM Tivoli Monitoring Agent Builder
D. IBM Tivoli Common Reporting
Answer: B

 takes too much time if you prepare from the material recommended by H13-211_V1.0 or uncertified third parties. Confusions and fear of the H13-211_V1.0 ' marker.Nexus-5548-B(config)#
A. The vPC domain has already been configured
B. The vPC links have to be configured before the vPC domain can be added
C. vPC domain cannot be configured at the global prompt
D. Have not yet turned on the vpc feature using the 'feature vpc' command
Answer: D

NEW QUESTION: 3
What is the name of the protocol use to set up and manage Security Associations (SA) for IP Security (IPSec)?
A. Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
B. Secure Key Exchange Mechanism
C. Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol
D. Oakley
Answer: A
Explanation:
Explanation/Reference:
The Key management for IPSec is called the Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
Note: IKE underwent a series of improvements establishing IKEv2 with RFC 4306. The basis of this answer is IKEv2.
The IKE protocol is a hybrid of three other protocols: ISAKMP (Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol), Oakley and SKEME. ISAKMP provides a framework for authentication and key exchange, but does not define them (neither authentication nor key exchange). The Oakley protocol describes a series of modes for key exchange and the SKEME protocol defines key exchange techniques.
IKE-Internet Key Exchange. A hybrid protocol that implements Oakley and Skeme key exchanges inside the ISAKMP framework. IKE can be used with other protocols, but its initial implementation is with the IPSec protocol. IKE provides authentication of the IPSec peers, negotiates IPSec keys, and negotiates IPSec security associations.
IKE is implemented in accordance with RFC 2409, The Internet Key Exchange.
The Internet Key Exchange (IKE) security protocol is a key management protocol standard that is used in conjunction with the IPSec standard. IPSec can be configured without IKE, but IKE enhances IPSec by providing additional features, flexibility, and ease of configuration for the IPSec standard.
IKE is a hybrid protocol that implements the Oakley key exchange and the SKEME key exchange inside the Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) framework. (ISAKMP, Oakley, and SKEME are security protocols implemented by IKE.)
IKE automatically negotiates IPSec security associations (SAs) and enables IPSec secure communications without costly manual preconfiguration. Specifically, IKE provides these benefits:
*Eliminates the need to manually specify all the IPSec security parameters in the crypto maps at both peers.
*Allows you to specify a lifetime for the IPSec security association.
*Allows encryption keys to change during IPSec sessions.
*Allows IPSec to provide anti-replay services.
*Permits certification authority (CA) support for a manageable, scalable IPSec implementation.
*Allows dynamic authentication of peers.
About ISAKMP
The Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) is a framework that defines the phases for establishing a secure relationship and support for negotiation of security attributes, it does not establish sessions keys by itself, it is used along with the Oakley session key establishment protocol. The Secure Key Exchange Mechanism (SKEME) describes a secure exchange mechanism and Oakley defines the modes of operation needed to establish a secure connection.
ISAKMP provides a framework for Internet key management and provides the specific protocol support for negotiation of security attributes. Alone, it does not establish session keys. However it can be used with various session key establishment protocols, such as Oakley, to provide a complete solution to Internet key management.
About Oakley
The Oakley protocol uses a hybrid Diffie-Hellman technique to establish session keys on Internet hosts and routers. Oakley provides the important security property of Perfect Forward Secrecy (PFS) and is based on cryptographic techniques that have survived substantial public scrutiny. Oakley can be used by itself, if no attribute negotiation is needed, or Oakley can be used in conjunction with ISAKMP. When ISAKMP is used with Oakley, key escrow is not feasible.
The ISAKMP and Oakley protocols have been combined into a hybrid protocol. The resolution of ISAKMP with Oakley uses the framework of ISAKMP to support a subset of Oakley key exchange modes. This new key exchange protocol provides optional PFS, full security association attribute negotiation, and authentication methods that provide both repudiation and non-repudiation. Implementations of this protocol can be used to establish VPNs and also allow for users from remote sites (who may have a dynamically allocated IP address) access to a secure network.
About IPSec
The IETF's IPSec Working Group develops standards for IP-layer security mechanisms for both IPv4 and IPv6. The group also is developing generic key management protocols for use on the Internet. For more information, refer to the IP Security and Encryption Overview.
IPSec is a framework of open standards developed by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) that provides security for transmission of sensitive information over unprotected networks such as the Internet.
It acts at the network level and implements the following standards:
IPSec
Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
Data Encryption Standard (DES)
MD5 (HMAC variant)
SHA (HMAC variant)
Authentication Header (AH)
Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP)
IPSec services provide a robust security solution that is standards-based. IPSec also provides data authentication and anti-replay services in addition to data confidentiality services.
For more information regarding IPSec, refer to the chapter "Configuring IPSec Network Security." About SKEME
SKEME constitutes a compact protocol that supports a variety of realistic scenarios and security models over Internet. It provides clear tradeoffs between security and performance as required by the different scenarios without incurring in unnecessary system complexity. The protocol supports key exchange based on public key, key distribution centers, or manual installation, and provides for fast and secure key refreshment. In addition, SKEME selectively provides perfect forward secrecy, allows for replaceability and negotiation of the underlying cryptographic primitives, and addresses privacy issues as anonymity and repudiatability
SKEME's basic mode is based on the use of public keys and a Diffie-Hellman shared secret generation.
However, SKEME is not restricted to the use of public keys, but also allows the use of a pre-shared key.
This key can be obtained by manual distribution or by the intermediary of a key distribution center (KDC) such as Kerberos.
In short, SKEME contains four distinct modes:
Basic mode, which provides a key exchange based on public keys and ensures PFS thanks to Diffie- Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of public keys, but without Diffie-Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of a pre-shared key and on Diffie-Hellman.
A mechanism of fast rekeying based only on symmetrical algorithms.
In addition, SKEME is composed of three phases: SHARE, EXCH and AUTH.
During the SHARE phase, the peers exchange half-keys, encrypted with their respective public keys.
These two half-keys are used to compute a secret key K. If anonymity is wanted, the identities of the two peers are also encrypted. If a shared secret already exists, this phase is skipped.
The exchange phase (EXCH) is used, depending on the selected mode, to exchange either Diffie- Hellman public values or nonces. The Diffie-Hellman shared secret will only be computed after the end of the exchanges.
The public values or nonces are authenticated during the authentication phase (AUTH), using the secret key established during the SHARE phase.
The messages from these three phases do not necessarily follow the order described above; in actual practice they are combined to minimize the number of exchanged messages.
References used for this question:
Source: KRUTZ, Ronald L. & VINES, Russel D., The CISSP Prep Guide: Mastering the Ten Domains of Computer Security, John Wiley & Sons, 2001, Chapter 4: Cryptography (page 172).
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4306
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4301
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_Key_Exchange
CISCO ISAKMP and OAKLEY information
CISCO Configuring Internet Key Exchange Protocol
http://www.hsc.fr/ressources/articles/ipsec-tech/index.html.en

NEW QUESTION: 4
A customer must perform trend analysis for future growth. Which product should be included in the design?
A. IBM System Director
B. IBM Tivoli Performance Analyzer
C. IBM Tivoli Monitoring Agent Builder
D. IBM Tivoli Common Reporting
Answer: B

exam questions devastate your preparation. You can protect yourself from the fear, confusion, failure, loss of time and money by using Dumps Questions H13-211_V1.0 Certification ' marker.Nexus-5548-B(config)#
A. The vPC domain has already been configured
B. The vPC links have to be configured before the vPC domain can be added
C. vPC domain cannot be configured at the global prompt
D. Have not yet turned on the vpc feature using the 'feature vpc' command
Answer: D

NEW QUESTION: 3
What is the name of the protocol use to set up and manage Security Associations (SA) for IP Security (IPSec)?
A. Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
B. Secure Key Exchange Mechanism
C. Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol
D. Oakley
Answer: A
Explanation:
Explanation/Reference:
The Key management for IPSec is called the Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
Note: IKE underwent a series of improvements establishing IKEv2 with RFC 4306. The basis of this answer is IKEv2.
The IKE protocol is a hybrid of three other protocols: ISAKMP (Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol), Oakley and SKEME. ISAKMP provides a framework for authentication and key exchange, but does not define them (neither authentication nor key exchange). The Oakley protocol describes a series of modes for key exchange and the SKEME protocol defines key exchange techniques.
IKE-Internet Key Exchange. A hybrid protocol that implements Oakley and Skeme key exchanges inside the ISAKMP framework. IKE can be used with other protocols, but its initial implementation is with the IPSec protocol. IKE provides authentication of the IPSec peers, negotiates IPSec keys, and negotiates IPSec security associations.
IKE is implemented in accordance with RFC 2409, The Internet Key Exchange.
The Internet Key Exchange (IKE) security protocol is a key management protocol standard that is used in conjunction with the IPSec standard. IPSec can be configured without IKE, but IKE enhances IPSec by providing additional features, flexibility, and ease of configuration for the IPSec standard.
IKE is a hybrid protocol that implements the Oakley key exchange and the SKEME key exchange inside the Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) framework. (ISAKMP, Oakley, and SKEME are security protocols implemented by IKE.)
IKE automatically negotiates IPSec security associations (SAs) and enables IPSec secure communications without costly manual preconfiguration. Specifically, IKE provides these benefits:
*Eliminates the need to manually specify all the IPSec security parameters in the crypto maps at both peers.
*Allows you to specify a lifetime for the IPSec security association.
*Allows encryption keys to change during IPSec sessions.
*Allows IPSec to provide anti-replay services.
*Permits certification authority (CA) support for a manageable, scalable IPSec implementation.
*Allows dynamic authentication of peers.
About ISAKMP
The Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) is a framework that defines the phases for establishing a secure relationship and support for negotiation of security attributes, it does not establish sessions keys by itself, it is used along with the Oakley session key establishment protocol. The Secure Key Exchange Mechanism (SKEME) describes a secure exchange mechanism and Oakley defines the modes of operation needed to establish a secure connection.
ISAKMP provides a framework for Internet key management and provides the specific protocol support for negotiation of security attributes. Alone, it does not establish session keys. However it can be used with various session key establishment protocols, such as Oakley, to provide a complete solution to Internet key management.
About Oakley
The Oakley protocol uses a hybrid Diffie-Hellman technique to establish session keys on Internet hosts and routers. Oakley provides the important security property of Perfect Forward Secrecy (PFS) and is based on cryptographic techniques that have survived substantial public scrutiny. Oakley can be used by itself, if no attribute negotiation is needed, or Oakley can be used in conjunction with ISAKMP. When ISAKMP is used with Oakley, key escrow is not feasible.
The ISAKMP and Oakley protocols have been combined into a hybrid protocol. The resolution of ISAKMP with Oakley uses the framework of ISAKMP to support a subset of Oakley key exchange modes. This new key exchange protocol provides optional PFS, full security association attribute negotiation, and authentication methods that provide both repudiation and non-repudiation. Implementations of this protocol can be used to establish VPNs and also allow for users from remote sites (who may have a dynamically allocated IP address) access to a secure network.
About IPSec
The IETF's IPSec Working Group develops standards for IP-layer security mechanisms for both IPv4 and IPv6. The group also is developing generic key management protocols for use on the Internet. For more information, refer to the IP Security and Encryption Overview.
IPSec is a framework of open standards developed by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) that provides security for transmission of sensitive information over unprotected networks such as the Internet.
It acts at the network level and implements the following standards:
IPSec
Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
Data Encryption Standard (DES)
MD5 (HMAC variant)
SHA (HMAC variant)
Authentication Header (AH)
Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP)
IPSec services provide a robust security solution that is standards-based. IPSec also provides data authentication and anti-replay services in addition to data confidentiality services.
For more information regarding IPSec, refer to the chapter "Configuring IPSec Network Security." About SKEME
SKEME constitutes a compact protocol that supports a variety of realistic scenarios and security models over Internet. It provides clear tradeoffs between security and performance as required by the different scenarios without incurring in unnecessary system complexity. The protocol supports key exchange based on public key, key distribution centers, or manual installation, and provides for fast and secure key refreshment. In addition, SKEME selectively provides perfect forward secrecy, allows for replaceability and negotiation of the underlying cryptographic primitives, and addresses privacy issues as anonymity and repudiatability
SKEME's basic mode is based on the use of public keys and a Diffie-Hellman shared secret generation.
However, SKEME is not restricted to the use of public keys, but also allows the use of a pre-shared key.
This key can be obtained by manual distribution or by the intermediary of a key distribution center (KDC) such as Kerberos.
In short, SKEME contains four distinct modes:
Basic mode, which provides a key exchange based on public keys and ensures PFS thanks to Diffie- Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of public keys, but without Diffie-Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of a pre-shared key and on Diffie-Hellman.
A mechanism of fast rekeying based only on symmetrical algorithms.
In addition, SKEME is composed of three phases: SHARE, EXCH and AUTH.
During the SHARE phase, the peers exchange half-keys, encrypted with their respective public keys.
These two half-keys are used to compute a secret key K. If anonymity is wanted, the identities of the two peers are also encrypted. If a shared secret already exists, this phase is skipped.
The exchange phase (EXCH) is used, depending on the selected mode, to exchange either Diffie- Hellman public values or nonces. The Diffie-Hellman shared secret will only be computed after the end of the exchanges.
The public values or nonces are authenticated during the authentication phase (AUTH), using the secret key established during the SHARE phase.
The messages from these three phases do not necessarily follow the order described above; in actual practice they are combined to minimize the number of exchanged messages.
References used for this question:
Source: KRUTZ, Ronald L. & VINES, Russel D., The CISSP Prep Guide: Mastering the Ten Domains of Computer Security, John Wiley & Sons, 2001, Chapter 4: Cryptography (page 172).
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4306
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4301
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_Key_Exchange
CISCO ISAKMP and OAKLEY information
CISCO Configuring Internet Key Exchange Protocol
http://www.hsc.fr/ressources/articles/ipsec-tech/index.html.en

NEW QUESTION: 4
A customer must perform trend analysis for future growth. Which product should be included in the design?
A. IBM System Director
B. IBM Tivoli Performance Analyzer
C. IBM Tivoli Monitoring Agent Builder
D. IBM Tivoli Common Reporting
Answer: B

exam dumps material. Dumps Questions provides excellent Amazon ' marker.Nexus-5548-B(config)#
A. The vPC domain has already been configured
B. The vPC links have to be configured before the vPC domain can be added
C. vPC domain cannot be configured at the global prompt
D. Have not yet turned on the vpc feature using the 'feature vpc' command
Answer: D

NEW QUESTION: 3
What is the name of the protocol use to set up and manage Security Associations (SA) for IP Security (IPSec)?
A. Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
B. Secure Key Exchange Mechanism
C. Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol
D. Oakley
Answer: A
Explanation:
Explanation/Reference:
The Key management for IPSec is called the Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
Note: IKE underwent a series of improvements establishing IKEv2 with RFC 4306. The basis of this answer is IKEv2.
The IKE protocol is a hybrid of three other protocols: ISAKMP (Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol), Oakley and SKEME. ISAKMP provides a framework for authentication and key exchange, but does not define them (neither authentication nor key exchange). The Oakley protocol describes a series of modes for key exchange and the SKEME protocol defines key exchange techniques.
IKE-Internet Key Exchange. A hybrid protocol that implements Oakley and Skeme key exchanges inside the ISAKMP framework. IKE can be used with other protocols, but its initial implementation is with the IPSec protocol. IKE provides authentication of the IPSec peers, negotiates IPSec keys, and negotiates IPSec security associations.
IKE is implemented in accordance with RFC 2409, The Internet Key Exchange.
The Internet Key Exchange (IKE) security protocol is a key management protocol standard that is used in conjunction with the IPSec standard. IPSec can be configured without IKE, but IKE enhances IPSec by providing additional features, flexibility, and ease of configuration for the IPSec standard.
IKE is a hybrid protocol that implements the Oakley key exchange and the SKEME key exchange inside the Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) framework. (ISAKMP, Oakley, and SKEME are security protocols implemented by IKE.)
IKE automatically negotiates IPSec security associations (SAs) and enables IPSec secure communications without costly manual preconfiguration. Specifically, IKE provides these benefits:
*Eliminates the need to manually specify all the IPSec security parameters in the crypto maps at both peers.
*Allows you to specify a lifetime for the IPSec security association.
*Allows encryption keys to change during IPSec sessions.
*Allows IPSec to provide anti-replay services.
*Permits certification authority (CA) support for a manageable, scalable IPSec implementation.
*Allows dynamic authentication of peers.
About ISAKMP
The Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) is a framework that defines the phases for establishing a secure relationship and support for negotiation of security attributes, it does not establish sessions keys by itself, it is used along with the Oakley session key establishment protocol. The Secure Key Exchange Mechanism (SKEME) describes a secure exchange mechanism and Oakley defines the modes of operation needed to establish a secure connection.
ISAKMP provides a framework for Internet key management and provides the specific protocol support for negotiation of security attributes. Alone, it does not establish session keys. However it can be used with various session key establishment protocols, such as Oakley, to provide a complete solution to Internet key management.
About Oakley
The Oakley protocol uses a hybrid Diffie-Hellman technique to establish session keys on Internet hosts and routers. Oakley provides the important security property of Perfect Forward Secrecy (PFS) and is based on cryptographic techniques that have survived substantial public scrutiny. Oakley can be used by itself, if no attribute negotiation is needed, or Oakley can be used in conjunction with ISAKMP. When ISAKMP is used with Oakley, key escrow is not feasible.
The ISAKMP and Oakley protocols have been combined into a hybrid protocol. The resolution of ISAKMP with Oakley uses the framework of ISAKMP to support a subset of Oakley key exchange modes. This new key exchange protocol provides optional PFS, full security association attribute negotiation, and authentication methods that provide both repudiation and non-repudiation. Implementations of this protocol can be used to establish VPNs and also allow for users from remote sites (who may have a dynamically allocated IP address) access to a secure network.
About IPSec
The IETF's IPSec Working Group develops standards for IP-layer security mechanisms for both IPv4 and IPv6. The group also is developing generic key management protocols for use on the Internet. For more information, refer to the IP Security and Encryption Overview.
IPSec is a framework of open standards developed by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) that provides security for transmission of sensitive information over unprotected networks such as the Internet.
It acts at the network level and implements the following standards:
IPSec
Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
Data Encryption Standard (DES)
MD5 (HMAC variant)
SHA (HMAC variant)
Authentication Header (AH)
Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP)
IPSec services provide a robust security solution that is standards-based. IPSec also provides data authentication and anti-replay services in addition to data confidentiality services.
For more information regarding IPSec, refer to the chapter "Configuring IPSec Network Security." About SKEME
SKEME constitutes a compact protocol that supports a variety of realistic scenarios and security models over Internet. It provides clear tradeoffs between security and performance as required by the different scenarios without incurring in unnecessary system complexity. The protocol supports key exchange based on public key, key distribution centers, or manual installation, and provides for fast and secure key refreshment. In addition, SKEME selectively provides perfect forward secrecy, allows for replaceability and negotiation of the underlying cryptographic primitives, and addresses privacy issues as anonymity and repudiatability
SKEME's basic mode is based on the use of public keys and a Diffie-Hellman shared secret generation.
However, SKEME is not restricted to the use of public keys, but also allows the use of a pre-shared key.
This key can be obtained by manual distribution or by the intermediary of a key distribution center (KDC) such as Kerberos.
In short, SKEME contains four distinct modes:
Basic mode, which provides a key exchange based on public keys and ensures PFS thanks to Diffie- Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of public keys, but without Diffie-Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of a pre-shared key and on Diffie-Hellman.
A mechanism of fast rekeying based only on symmetrical algorithms.
In addition, SKEME is composed of three phases: SHARE, EXCH and AUTH.
During the SHARE phase, the peers exchange half-keys, encrypted with their respective public keys.
These two half-keys are used to compute a secret key K. If anonymity is wanted, the identities of the two peers are also encrypted. If a shared secret already exists, this phase is skipped.
The exchange phase (EXCH) is used, depending on the selected mode, to exchange either Diffie- Hellman public values or nonces. The Diffie-Hellman shared secret will only be computed after the end of the exchanges.
The public values or nonces are authenticated during the authentication phase (AUTH), using the secret key established during the SHARE phase.
The messages from these three phases do not necessarily follow the order described above; in actual practice they are combined to minimize the number of exchanged messages.
References used for this question:
Source: KRUTZ, Ronald L. & VINES, Russel D., The CISSP Prep Guide: Mastering the Ten Domains of Computer Security, John Wiley & Sons, 2001, Chapter 4: Cryptography (page 172).
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4306
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4301
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_Key_Exchange
CISCO ISAKMP and OAKLEY information
CISCO Configuring Internet Key Exchange Protocol
http://www.hsc.fr/ressources/articles/ipsec-tech/index.html.en

NEW QUESTION: 4
A customer must perform trend analysis for future growth. Which product should be included in the design?
A. IBM System Director
B. IBM Tivoli Performance Analyzer
C. IBM Tivoli Monitoring Agent Builder
D. IBM Tivoli Common Reporting
Answer: B

dumps questions in PDF format. Our ' marker.Nexus-5548-B(config)#
A. The vPC domain has already been configured
B. The vPC links have to be configured before the vPC domain can be added
C. vPC domain cannot be configured at the global prompt
D. Have not yet turned on the vpc feature using the 'feature vpc' command
Answer: D

NEW QUESTION: 3
What is the name of the protocol use to set up and manage Security Associations (SA) for IP Security (IPSec)?
A. Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
B. Secure Key Exchange Mechanism
C. Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol
D. Oakley
Answer: A
Explanation:
Explanation/Reference:
The Key management for IPSec is called the Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
Note: IKE underwent a series of improvements establishing IKEv2 with RFC 4306. The basis of this answer is IKEv2.
The IKE protocol is a hybrid of three other protocols: ISAKMP (Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol), Oakley and SKEME. ISAKMP provides a framework for authentication and key exchange, but does not define them (neither authentication nor key exchange). The Oakley protocol describes a series of modes for key exchange and the SKEME protocol defines key exchange techniques.
IKE-Internet Key Exchange. A hybrid protocol that implements Oakley and Skeme key exchanges inside the ISAKMP framework. IKE can be used with other protocols, but its initial implementation is with the IPSec protocol. IKE provides authentication of the IPSec peers, negotiates IPSec keys, and negotiates IPSec security associations.
IKE is implemented in accordance with RFC 2409, The Internet Key Exchange.
The Internet Key Exchange (IKE) security protocol is a key management protocol standard that is used in conjunction with the IPSec standard. IPSec can be configured without IKE, but IKE enhances IPSec by providing additional features, flexibility, and ease of configuration for the IPSec standard.
IKE is a hybrid protocol that implements the Oakley key exchange and the SKEME key exchange inside the Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) framework. (ISAKMP, Oakley, and SKEME are security protocols implemented by IKE.)
IKE automatically negotiates IPSec security associations (SAs) and enables IPSec secure communications without costly manual preconfiguration. Specifically, IKE provides these benefits:
*Eliminates the need to manually specify all the IPSec security parameters in the crypto maps at both peers.
*Allows you to specify a lifetime for the IPSec security association.
*Allows encryption keys to change during IPSec sessions.
*Allows IPSec to provide anti-replay services.
*Permits certification authority (CA) support for a manageable, scalable IPSec implementation.
*Allows dynamic authentication of peers.
About ISAKMP
The Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) is a framework that defines the phases for establishing a secure relationship and support for negotiation of security attributes, it does not establish sessions keys by itself, it is used along with the Oakley session key establishment protocol. The Secure Key Exchange Mechanism (SKEME) describes a secure exchange mechanism and Oakley defines the modes of operation needed to establish a secure connection.
ISAKMP provides a framework for Internet key management and provides the specific protocol support for negotiation of security attributes. Alone, it does not establish session keys. However it can be used with various session key establishment protocols, such as Oakley, to provide a complete solution to Internet key management.
About Oakley
The Oakley protocol uses a hybrid Diffie-Hellman technique to establish session keys on Internet hosts and routers. Oakley provides the important security property of Perfect Forward Secrecy (PFS) and is based on cryptographic techniques that have survived substantial public scrutiny. Oakley can be used by itself, if no attribute negotiation is needed, or Oakley can be used in conjunction with ISAKMP. When ISAKMP is used with Oakley, key escrow is not feasible.
The ISAKMP and Oakley protocols have been combined into a hybrid protocol. The resolution of ISAKMP with Oakley uses the framework of ISAKMP to support a subset of Oakley key exchange modes. This new key exchange protocol provides optional PFS, full security association attribute negotiation, and authentication methods that provide both repudiation and non-repudiation. Implementations of this protocol can be used to establish VPNs and also allow for users from remote sites (who may have a dynamically allocated IP address) access to a secure network.
About IPSec
The IETF's IPSec Working Group develops standards for IP-layer security mechanisms for both IPv4 and IPv6. The group also is developing generic key management protocols for use on the Internet. For more information, refer to the IP Security and Encryption Overview.
IPSec is a framework of open standards developed by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) that provides security for transmission of sensitive information over unprotected networks such as the Internet.
It acts at the network level and implements the following standards:
IPSec
Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
Data Encryption Standard (DES)
MD5 (HMAC variant)
SHA (HMAC variant)
Authentication Header (AH)
Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP)
IPSec services provide a robust security solution that is standards-based. IPSec also provides data authentication and anti-replay services in addition to data confidentiality services.
For more information regarding IPSec, refer to the chapter "Configuring IPSec Network Security." About SKEME
SKEME constitutes a compact protocol that supports a variety of realistic scenarios and security models over Internet. It provides clear tradeoffs between security and performance as required by the different scenarios without incurring in unnecessary system complexity. The protocol supports key exchange based on public key, key distribution centers, or manual installation, and provides for fast and secure key refreshment. In addition, SKEME selectively provides perfect forward secrecy, allows for replaceability and negotiation of the underlying cryptographic primitives, and addresses privacy issues as anonymity and repudiatability
SKEME's basic mode is based on the use of public keys and a Diffie-Hellman shared secret generation.
However, SKEME is not restricted to the use of public keys, but also allows the use of a pre-shared key.
This key can be obtained by manual distribution or by the intermediary of a key distribution center (KDC) such as Kerberos.
In short, SKEME contains four distinct modes:
Basic mode, which provides a key exchange based on public keys and ensures PFS thanks to Diffie- Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of public keys, but without Diffie-Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of a pre-shared key and on Diffie-Hellman.
A mechanism of fast rekeying based only on symmetrical algorithms.
In addition, SKEME is composed of three phases: SHARE, EXCH and AUTH.
During the SHARE phase, the peers exchange half-keys, encrypted with their respective public keys.
These two half-keys are used to compute a secret key K. If anonymity is wanted, the identities of the two peers are also encrypted. If a shared secret already exists, this phase is skipped.
The exchange phase (EXCH) is used, depending on the selected mode, to exchange either Diffie- Hellman public values or nonces. The Diffie-Hellman shared secret will only be computed after the end of the exchanges.
The public values or nonces are authenticated during the authentication phase (AUTH), using the secret key established during the SHARE phase.
The messages from these three phases do not necessarily follow the order described above; in actual practice they are combined to minimize the number of exchanged messages.
References used for this question:
Source: KRUTZ, Ronald L. & VINES, Russel D., The CISSP Prep Guide: Mastering the Ten Domains of Computer Security, John Wiley & Sons, 2001, Chapter 4: Cryptography (page 172).
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4306
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4301
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_Key_Exchange
CISCO ISAKMP and OAKLEY information
CISCO Configuring Internet Key Exchange Protocol
http://www.hsc.fr/ressources/articles/ipsec-tech/index.html.en

NEW QUESTION: 4
A customer must perform trend analysis for future growth. Which product should be included in the design?
A. IBM System Director
B. IBM Tivoli Performance Analyzer
C. IBM Tivoli Monitoring Agent Builder
D. IBM Tivoli Common Reporting
Answer: B

 exam questions in PDF are compatible with all OS and devices and are definitely going to help you get awesome grades in H13-211_V1.0 ' marker.Nexus-5548-B(config)#
A. The vPC domain has already been configured
B. The vPC links have to be configured before the vPC domain can be added
C. vPC domain cannot be configured at the global prompt
D. Have not yet turned on the vpc feature using the 'feature vpc' command
Answer: D

NEW QUESTION: 3
What is the name of the protocol use to set up and manage Security Associations (SA) for IP Security (IPSec)?
A. Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
B. Secure Key Exchange Mechanism
C. Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol
D. Oakley
Answer: A
Explanation:
Explanation/Reference:
The Key management for IPSec is called the Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
Note: IKE underwent a series of improvements establishing IKEv2 with RFC 4306. The basis of this answer is IKEv2.
The IKE protocol is a hybrid of three other protocols: ISAKMP (Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol), Oakley and SKEME. ISAKMP provides a framework for authentication and key exchange, but does not define them (neither authentication nor key exchange). The Oakley protocol describes a series of modes for key exchange and the SKEME protocol defines key exchange techniques.
IKE-Internet Key Exchange. A hybrid protocol that implements Oakley and Skeme key exchanges inside the ISAKMP framework. IKE can be used with other protocols, but its initial implementation is with the IPSec protocol. IKE provides authentication of the IPSec peers, negotiates IPSec keys, and negotiates IPSec security associations.
IKE is implemented in accordance with RFC 2409, The Internet Key Exchange.
The Internet Key Exchange (IKE) security protocol is a key management protocol standard that is used in conjunction with the IPSec standard. IPSec can be configured without IKE, but IKE enhances IPSec by providing additional features, flexibility, and ease of configuration for the IPSec standard.
IKE is a hybrid protocol that implements the Oakley key exchange and the SKEME key exchange inside the Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) framework. (ISAKMP, Oakley, and SKEME are security protocols implemented by IKE.)
IKE automatically negotiates IPSec security associations (SAs) and enables IPSec secure communications without costly manual preconfiguration. Specifically, IKE provides these benefits:
*Eliminates the need to manually specify all the IPSec security parameters in the crypto maps at both peers.
*Allows you to specify a lifetime for the IPSec security association.
*Allows encryption keys to change during IPSec sessions.
*Allows IPSec to provide anti-replay services.
*Permits certification authority (CA) support for a manageable, scalable IPSec implementation.
*Allows dynamic authentication of peers.
About ISAKMP
The Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) is a framework that defines the phases for establishing a secure relationship and support for negotiation of security attributes, it does not establish sessions keys by itself, it is used along with the Oakley session key establishment protocol. The Secure Key Exchange Mechanism (SKEME) describes a secure exchange mechanism and Oakley defines the modes of operation needed to establish a secure connection.
ISAKMP provides a framework for Internet key management and provides the specific protocol support for negotiation of security attributes. Alone, it does not establish session keys. However it can be used with various session key establishment protocols, such as Oakley, to provide a complete solution to Internet key management.
About Oakley
The Oakley protocol uses a hybrid Diffie-Hellman technique to establish session keys on Internet hosts and routers. Oakley provides the important security property of Perfect Forward Secrecy (PFS) and is based on cryptographic techniques that have survived substantial public scrutiny. Oakley can be used by itself, if no attribute negotiation is needed, or Oakley can be used in conjunction with ISAKMP. When ISAKMP is used with Oakley, key escrow is not feasible.
The ISAKMP and Oakley protocols have been combined into a hybrid protocol. The resolution of ISAKMP with Oakley uses the framework of ISAKMP to support a subset of Oakley key exchange modes. This new key exchange protocol provides optional PFS, full security association attribute negotiation, and authentication methods that provide both repudiation and non-repudiation. Implementations of this protocol can be used to establish VPNs and also allow for users from remote sites (who may have a dynamically allocated IP address) access to a secure network.
About IPSec
The IETF's IPSec Working Group develops standards for IP-layer security mechanisms for both IPv4 and IPv6. The group also is developing generic key management protocols for use on the Internet. For more information, refer to the IP Security and Encryption Overview.
IPSec is a framework of open standards developed by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) that provides security for transmission of sensitive information over unprotected networks such as the Internet.
It acts at the network level and implements the following standards:
IPSec
Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
Data Encryption Standard (DES)
MD5 (HMAC variant)
SHA (HMAC variant)
Authentication Header (AH)
Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP)
IPSec services provide a robust security solution that is standards-based. IPSec also provides data authentication and anti-replay services in addition to data confidentiality services.
For more information regarding IPSec, refer to the chapter "Configuring IPSec Network Security." About SKEME
SKEME constitutes a compact protocol that supports a variety of realistic scenarios and security models over Internet. It provides clear tradeoffs between security and performance as required by the different scenarios without incurring in unnecessary system complexity. The protocol supports key exchange based on public key, key distribution centers, or manual installation, and provides for fast and secure key refreshment. In addition, SKEME selectively provides perfect forward secrecy, allows for replaceability and negotiation of the underlying cryptographic primitives, and addresses privacy issues as anonymity and repudiatability
SKEME's basic mode is based on the use of public keys and a Diffie-Hellman shared secret generation.
However, SKEME is not restricted to the use of public keys, but also allows the use of a pre-shared key.
This key can be obtained by manual distribution or by the intermediary of a key distribution center (KDC) such as Kerberos.
In short, SKEME contains four distinct modes:
Basic mode, which provides a key exchange based on public keys and ensures PFS thanks to Diffie- Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of public keys, but without Diffie-Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of a pre-shared key and on Diffie-Hellman.
A mechanism of fast rekeying based only on symmetrical algorithms.
In addition, SKEME is composed of three phases: SHARE, EXCH and AUTH.
During the SHARE phase, the peers exchange half-keys, encrypted with their respective public keys.
These two half-keys are used to compute a secret key K. If anonymity is wanted, the identities of the two peers are also encrypted. If a shared secret already exists, this phase is skipped.
The exchange phase (EXCH) is used, depending on the selected mode, to exchange either Diffie- Hellman public values or nonces. The Diffie-Hellman shared secret will only be computed after the end of the exchanges.
The public values or nonces are authenticated during the authentication phase (AUTH), using the secret key established during the SHARE phase.
The messages from these three phases do not necessarily follow the order described above; in actual practice they are combined to minimize the number of exchanged messages.
References used for this question:
Source: KRUTZ, Ronald L. & VINES, Russel D., The CISSP Prep Guide: Mastering the Ten Domains of Computer Security, John Wiley & Sons, 2001, Chapter 4: Cryptography (page 172).
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4306
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4301
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_Key_Exchange
CISCO ISAKMP and OAKLEY information
CISCO Configuring Internet Key Exchange Protocol
http://www.hsc.fr/ressources/articles/ipsec-tech/index.html.en

NEW QUESTION: 4
A customer must perform trend analysis for future growth. Which product should be included in the design?
A. IBM System Director
B. IBM Tivoli Performance Analyzer
C. IBM Tivoli Monitoring Agent Builder
D. IBM Tivoli Common Reporting
Answer: B

 exam
.  Dumps Questions ' marker.Nexus-5548-B(config)#
A. The vPC domain has already been configured
B. The vPC links have to be configured before the vPC domain can be added
C. vPC domain cannot be configured at the global prompt
D. Have not yet turned on the vpc feature using the 'feature vpc' command
Answer: D

NEW QUESTION: 3
What is the name of the protocol use to set up and manage Security Associations (SA) for IP Security (IPSec)?
A. Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
B. Secure Key Exchange Mechanism
C. Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol
D. Oakley
Answer: A
Explanation:
Explanation/Reference:
The Key management for IPSec is called the Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
Note: IKE underwent a series of improvements establishing IKEv2 with RFC 4306. The basis of this answer is IKEv2.
The IKE protocol is a hybrid of three other protocols: ISAKMP (Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol), Oakley and SKEME. ISAKMP provides a framework for authentication and key exchange, but does not define them (neither authentication nor key exchange). The Oakley protocol describes a series of modes for key exchange and the SKEME protocol defines key exchange techniques.
IKE-Internet Key Exchange. A hybrid protocol that implements Oakley and Skeme key exchanges inside the ISAKMP framework. IKE can be used with other protocols, but its initial implementation is with the IPSec protocol. IKE provides authentication of the IPSec peers, negotiates IPSec keys, and negotiates IPSec security associations.
IKE is implemented in accordance with RFC 2409, The Internet Key Exchange.
The Internet Key Exchange (IKE) security protocol is a key management protocol standard that is used in conjunction with the IPSec standard. IPSec can be configured without IKE, but IKE enhances IPSec by providing additional features, flexibility, and ease of configuration for the IPSec standard.
IKE is a hybrid protocol that implements the Oakley key exchange and the SKEME key exchange inside the Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) framework. (ISAKMP, Oakley, and SKEME are security protocols implemented by IKE.)
IKE automatically negotiates IPSec security associations (SAs) and enables IPSec secure communications without costly manual preconfiguration. Specifically, IKE provides these benefits:
*Eliminates the need to manually specify all the IPSec security parameters in the crypto maps at both peers.
*Allows you to specify a lifetime for the IPSec security association.
*Allows encryption keys to change during IPSec sessions.
*Allows IPSec to provide anti-replay services.
*Permits certification authority (CA) support for a manageable, scalable IPSec implementation.
*Allows dynamic authentication of peers.
About ISAKMP
The Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) is a framework that defines the phases for establishing a secure relationship and support for negotiation of security attributes, it does not establish sessions keys by itself, it is used along with the Oakley session key establishment protocol. The Secure Key Exchange Mechanism (SKEME) describes a secure exchange mechanism and Oakley defines the modes of operation needed to establish a secure connection.
ISAKMP provides a framework for Internet key management and provides the specific protocol support for negotiation of security attributes. Alone, it does not establish session keys. However it can be used with various session key establishment protocols, such as Oakley, to provide a complete solution to Internet key management.
About Oakley
The Oakley protocol uses a hybrid Diffie-Hellman technique to establish session keys on Internet hosts and routers. Oakley provides the important security property of Perfect Forward Secrecy (PFS) and is based on cryptographic techniques that have survived substantial public scrutiny. Oakley can be used by itself, if no attribute negotiation is needed, or Oakley can be used in conjunction with ISAKMP. When ISAKMP is used with Oakley, key escrow is not feasible.
The ISAKMP and Oakley protocols have been combined into a hybrid protocol. The resolution of ISAKMP with Oakley uses the framework of ISAKMP to support a subset of Oakley key exchange modes. This new key exchange protocol provides optional PFS, full security association attribute negotiation, and authentication methods that provide both repudiation and non-repudiation. Implementations of this protocol can be used to establish VPNs and also allow for users from remote sites (who may have a dynamically allocated IP address) access to a secure network.
About IPSec
The IETF's IPSec Working Group develops standards for IP-layer security mechanisms for both IPv4 and IPv6. The group also is developing generic key management protocols for use on the Internet. For more information, refer to the IP Security and Encryption Overview.
IPSec is a framework of open standards developed by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) that provides security for transmission of sensitive information over unprotected networks such as the Internet.
It acts at the network level and implements the following standards:
IPSec
Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
Data Encryption Standard (DES)
MD5 (HMAC variant)
SHA (HMAC variant)
Authentication Header (AH)
Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP)
IPSec services provide a robust security solution that is standards-based. IPSec also provides data authentication and anti-replay services in addition to data confidentiality services.
For more information regarding IPSec, refer to the chapter "Configuring IPSec Network Security." About SKEME
SKEME constitutes a compact protocol that supports a variety of realistic scenarios and security models over Internet. It provides clear tradeoffs between security and performance as required by the different scenarios without incurring in unnecessary system complexity. The protocol supports key exchange based on public key, key distribution centers, or manual installation, and provides for fast and secure key refreshment. In addition, SKEME selectively provides perfect forward secrecy, allows for replaceability and negotiation of the underlying cryptographic primitives, and addresses privacy issues as anonymity and repudiatability
SKEME's basic mode is based on the use of public keys and a Diffie-Hellman shared secret generation.
However, SKEME is not restricted to the use of public keys, but also allows the use of a pre-shared key.
This key can be obtained by manual distribution or by the intermediary of a key distribution center (KDC) such as Kerberos.
In short, SKEME contains four distinct modes:
Basic mode, which provides a key exchange based on public keys and ensures PFS thanks to Diffie- Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of public keys, but without Diffie-Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of a pre-shared key and on Diffie-Hellman.
A mechanism of fast rekeying based only on symmetrical algorithms.
In addition, SKEME is composed of three phases: SHARE, EXCH and AUTH.
During the SHARE phase, the peers exchange half-keys, encrypted with their respective public keys.
These two half-keys are used to compute a secret key K. If anonymity is wanted, the identities of the two peers are also encrypted. If a shared secret already exists, this phase is skipped.
The exchange phase (EXCH) is used, depending on the selected mode, to exchange either Diffie- Hellman public values or nonces. The Diffie-Hellman shared secret will only be computed after the end of the exchanges.
The public values or nonces are authenticated during the authentication phase (AUTH), using the secret key established during the SHARE phase.
The messages from these three phases do not necessarily follow the order described above; in actual practice they are combined to minimize the number of exchanged messages.
References used for this question:
Source: KRUTZ, Ronald L. & VINES, Russel D., The CISSP Prep Guide: Mastering the Ten Domains of Computer Security, John Wiley & Sons, 2001, Chapter 4: Cryptography (page 172).
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4306
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4301
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_Key_Exchange
CISCO ISAKMP and OAKLEY information
CISCO Configuring Internet Key Exchange Protocol
http://www.hsc.fr/ressources/articles/ipsec-tech/index.html.en

NEW QUESTION: 4
A customer must perform trend analysis for future growth. Which product should be included in the design?
A. IBM System Director
B. IBM Tivoli Performance Analyzer
C. IBM Tivoli Monitoring Agent Builder
D. IBM Tivoli Common Reporting
Answer: B

exam PDF
is an excellent way to prepare for the exam because Dumps Questions provide you a fail-proof way of studying for the exam. We assure that the  ' marker.Nexus-5548-B(config)#
A. The vPC domain has already been configured
B. The vPC links have to be configured before the vPC domain can be added
C. vPC domain cannot be configured at the global prompt
D. Have not yet turned on the vpc feature using the 'feature vpc' command
Answer: D

NEW QUESTION: 3
What is the name of the protocol use to set up and manage Security Associations (SA) for IP Security (IPSec)?
A. Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
B. Secure Key Exchange Mechanism
C. Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol
D. Oakley
Answer: A
Explanation:
Explanation/Reference:
The Key management for IPSec is called the Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
Note: IKE underwent a series of improvements establishing IKEv2 with RFC 4306. The basis of this answer is IKEv2.
The IKE protocol is a hybrid of three other protocols: ISAKMP (Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol), Oakley and SKEME. ISAKMP provides a framework for authentication and key exchange, but does not define them (neither authentication nor key exchange). The Oakley protocol describes a series of modes for key exchange and the SKEME protocol defines key exchange techniques.
IKE-Internet Key Exchange. A hybrid protocol that implements Oakley and Skeme key exchanges inside the ISAKMP framework. IKE can be used with other protocols, but its initial implementation is with the IPSec protocol. IKE provides authentication of the IPSec peers, negotiates IPSec keys, and negotiates IPSec security associations.
IKE is implemented in accordance with RFC 2409, The Internet Key Exchange.
The Internet Key Exchange (IKE) security protocol is a key management protocol standard that is used in conjunction with the IPSec standard. IPSec can be configured without IKE, but IKE enhances IPSec by providing additional features, flexibility, and ease of configuration for the IPSec standard.
IKE is a hybrid protocol that implements the Oakley key exchange and the SKEME key exchange inside the Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) framework. (ISAKMP, Oakley, and SKEME are security protocols implemented by IKE.)
IKE automatically negotiates IPSec security associations (SAs) and enables IPSec secure communications without costly manual preconfiguration. Specifically, IKE provides these benefits:
*Eliminates the need to manually specify all the IPSec security parameters in the crypto maps at both peers.
*Allows you to specify a lifetime for the IPSec security association.
*Allows encryption keys to change during IPSec sessions.
*Allows IPSec to provide anti-replay services.
*Permits certification authority (CA) support for a manageable, scalable IPSec implementation.
*Allows dynamic authentication of peers.
About ISAKMP
The Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) is a framework that defines the phases for establishing a secure relationship and support for negotiation of security attributes, it does not establish sessions keys by itself, it is used along with the Oakley session key establishment protocol. The Secure Key Exchange Mechanism (SKEME) describes a secure exchange mechanism and Oakley defines the modes of operation needed to establish a secure connection.
ISAKMP provides a framework for Internet key management and provides the specific protocol support for negotiation of security attributes. Alone, it does not establish session keys. However it can be used with various session key establishment protocols, such as Oakley, to provide a complete solution to Internet key management.
About Oakley
The Oakley protocol uses a hybrid Diffie-Hellman technique to establish session keys on Internet hosts and routers. Oakley provides the important security property of Perfect Forward Secrecy (PFS) and is based on cryptographic techniques that have survived substantial public scrutiny. Oakley can be used by itself, if no attribute negotiation is needed, or Oakley can be used in conjunction with ISAKMP. When ISAKMP is used with Oakley, key escrow is not feasible.
The ISAKMP and Oakley protocols have been combined into a hybrid protocol. The resolution of ISAKMP with Oakley uses the framework of ISAKMP to support a subset of Oakley key exchange modes. This new key exchange protocol provides optional PFS, full security association attribute negotiation, and authentication methods that provide both repudiation and non-repudiation. Implementations of this protocol can be used to establish VPNs and also allow for users from remote sites (who may have a dynamically allocated IP address) access to a secure network.
About IPSec
The IETF's IPSec Working Group develops standards for IP-layer security mechanisms for both IPv4 and IPv6. The group also is developing generic key management protocols for use on the Internet. For more information, refer to the IP Security and Encryption Overview.
IPSec is a framework of open standards developed by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) that provides security for transmission of sensitive information over unprotected networks such as the Internet.
It acts at the network level and implements the following standards:
IPSec
Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
Data Encryption Standard (DES)
MD5 (HMAC variant)
SHA (HMAC variant)
Authentication Header (AH)
Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP)
IPSec services provide a robust security solution that is standards-based. IPSec also provides data authentication and anti-replay services in addition to data confidentiality services.
For more information regarding IPSec, refer to the chapter "Configuring IPSec Network Security." About SKEME
SKEME constitutes a compact protocol that supports a variety of realistic scenarios and security models over Internet. It provides clear tradeoffs between security and performance as required by the different scenarios without incurring in unnecessary system complexity. The protocol supports key exchange based on public key, key distribution centers, or manual installation, and provides for fast and secure key refreshment. In addition, SKEME selectively provides perfect forward secrecy, allows for replaceability and negotiation of the underlying cryptographic primitives, and addresses privacy issues as anonymity and repudiatability
SKEME's basic mode is based on the use of public keys and a Diffie-Hellman shared secret generation.
However, SKEME is not restricted to the use of public keys, but also allows the use of a pre-shared key.
This key can be obtained by manual distribution or by the intermediary of a key distribution center (KDC) such as Kerberos.
In short, SKEME contains four distinct modes:
Basic mode, which provides a key exchange based on public keys and ensures PFS thanks to Diffie- Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of public keys, but without Diffie-Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of a pre-shared key and on Diffie-Hellman.
A mechanism of fast rekeying based only on symmetrical algorithms.
In addition, SKEME is composed of three phases: SHARE, EXCH and AUTH.
During the SHARE phase, the peers exchange half-keys, encrypted with their respective public keys.
These two half-keys are used to compute a secret key K. If anonymity is wanted, the identities of the two peers are also encrypted. If a shared secret already exists, this phase is skipped.
The exchange phase (EXCH) is used, depending on the selected mode, to exchange either Diffie- Hellman public values or nonces. The Diffie-Hellman shared secret will only be computed after the end of the exchanges.
The public values or nonces are authenticated during the authentication phase (AUTH), using the secret key established during the SHARE phase.
The messages from these three phases do not necessarily follow the order described above; in actual practice they are combined to minimize the number of exchanged messages.
References used for this question:
Source: KRUTZ, Ronald L. & VINES, Russel D., The CISSP Prep Guide: Mastering the Ten Domains of Computer Security, John Wiley & Sons, 2001, Chapter 4: Cryptography (page 172).
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4306
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4301
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_Key_Exchange
CISCO ISAKMP and OAKLEY information
CISCO Configuring Internet Key Exchange Protocol
http://www.hsc.fr/ressources/articles/ipsec-tech/index.html.en

NEW QUESTION: 4
A customer must perform trend analysis for future growth. Which product should be included in the design?
A. IBM System Director
B. IBM Tivoli Performance Analyzer
C. IBM Tivoli Monitoring Agent Builder
D. IBM Tivoli Common Reporting
Answer: B

questions you get in the PDF file are perfectly according to the H13-211_V1.0 ' marker.Nexus-5548-B(config)#
A. The vPC domain has already been configured
B. The vPC links have to be configured before the vPC domain can be added
C. vPC domain cannot be configured at the global prompt
D. Have not yet turned on the vpc feature using the 'feature vpc' command
Answer: D

NEW QUESTION: 3
What is the name of the protocol use to set up and manage Security Associations (SA) for IP Security (IPSec)?
A. Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
B. Secure Key Exchange Mechanism
C. Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol
D. Oakley
Answer: A
Explanation:
Explanation/Reference:
The Key management for IPSec is called the Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
Note: IKE underwent a series of improvements establishing IKEv2 with RFC 4306. The basis of this answer is IKEv2.
The IKE protocol is a hybrid of three other protocols: ISAKMP (Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol), Oakley and SKEME. ISAKMP provides a framework for authentication and key exchange, but does not define them (neither authentication nor key exchange). The Oakley protocol describes a series of modes for key exchange and the SKEME protocol defines key exchange techniques.
IKE-Internet Key Exchange. A hybrid protocol that implements Oakley and Skeme key exchanges inside the ISAKMP framework. IKE can be used with other protocols, but its initial implementation is with the IPSec protocol. IKE provides authentication of the IPSec peers, negotiates IPSec keys, and negotiates IPSec security associations.
IKE is implemented in accordance with RFC 2409, The Internet Key Exchange.
The Internet Key Exchange (IKE) security protocol is a key management protocol standard that is used in conjunction with the IPSec standard. IPSec can be configured without IKE, but IKE enhances IPSec by providing additional features, flexibility, and ease of configuration for the IPSec standard.
IKE is a hybrid protocol that implements the Oakley key exchange and the SKEME key exchange inside the Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) framework. (ISAKMP, Oakley, and SKEME are security protocols implemented by IKE.)
IKE automatically negotiates IPSec security associations (SAs) and enables IPSec secure communications without costly manual preconfiguration. Specifically, IKE provides these benefits:
*Eliminates the need to manually specify all the IPSec security parameters in the crypto maps at both peers.
*Allows you to specify a lifetime for the IPSec security association.
*Allows encryption keys to change during IPSec sessions.
*Allows IPSec to provide anti-replay services.
*Permits certification authority (CA) support for a manageable, scalable IPSec implementation.
*Allows dynamic authentication of peers.
About ISAKMP
The Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) is a framework that defines the phases for establishing a secure relationship and support for negotiation of security attributes, it does not establish sessions keys by itself, it is used along with the Oakley session key establishment protocol. The Secure Key Exchange Mechanism (SKEME) describes a secure exchange mechanism and Oakley defines the modes of operation needed to establish a secure connection.
ISAKMP provides a framework for Internet key management and provides the specific protocol support for negotiation of security attributes. Alone, it does not establish session keys. However it can be used with various session key establishment protocols, such as Oakley, to provide a complete solution to Internet key management.
About Oakley
The Oakley protocol uses a hybrid Diffie-Hellman technique to establish session keys on Internet hosts and routers. Oakley provides the important security property of Perfect Forward Secrecy (PFS) and is based on cryptographic techniques that have survived substantial public scrutiny. Oakley can be used by itself, if no attribute negotiation is needed, or Oakley can be used in conjunction with ISAKMP. When ISAKMP is used with Oakley, key escrow is not feasible.
The ISAKMP and Oakley protocols have been combined into a hybrid protocol. The resolution of ISAKMP with Oakley uses the framework of ISAKMP to support a subset of Oakley key exchange modes. This new key exchange protocol provides optional PFS, full security association attribute negotiation, and authentication methods that provide both repudiation and non-repudiation. Implementations of this protocol can be used to establish VPNs and also allow for users from remote sites (who may have a dynamically allocated IP address) access to a secure network.
About IPSec
The IETF's IPSec Working Group develops standards for IP-layer security mechanisms for both IPv4 and IPv6. The group also is developing generic key management protocols for use on the Internet. For more information, refer to the IP Security and Encryption Overview.
IPSec is a framework of open standards developed by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) that provides security for transmission of sensitive information over unprotected networks such as the Internet.
It acts at the network level and implements the following standards:
IPSec
Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
Data Encryption Standard (DES)
MD5 (HMAC variant)
SHA (HMAC variant)
Authentication Header (AH)
Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP)
IPSec services provide a robust security solution that is standards-based. IPSec also provides data authentication and anti-replay services in addition to data confidentiality services.
For more information regarding IPSec, refer to the chapter "Configuring IPSec Network Security." About SKEME
SKEME constitutes a compact protocol that supports a variety of realistic scenarios and security models over Internet. It provides clear tradeoffs between security and performance as required by the different scenarios without incurring in unnecessary system complexity. The protocol supports key exchange based on public key, key distribution centers, or manual installation, and provides for fast and secure key refreshment. In addition, SKEME selectively provides perfect forward secrecy, allows for replaceability and negotiation of the underlying cryptographic primitives, and addresses privacy issues as anonymity and repudiatability
SKEME's basic mode is based on the use of public keys and a Diffie-Hellman shared secret generation.
However, SKEME is not restricted to the use of public keys, but also allows the use of a pre-shared key.
This key can be obtained by manual distribution or by the intermediary of a key distribution center (KDC) such as Kerberos.
In short, SKEME contains four distinct modes:
Basic mode, which provides a key exchange based on public keys and ensures PFS thanks to Diffie- Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of public keys, but without Diffie-Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of a pre-shared key and on Diffie-Hellman.
A mechanism of fast rekeying based only on symmetrical algorithms.
In addition, SKEME is composed of three phases: SHARE, EXCH and AUTH.
During the SHARE phase, the peers exchange half-keys, encrypted with their respective public keys.
These two half-keys are used to compute a secret key K. If anonymity is wanted, the identities of the two peers are also encrypted. If a shared secret already exists, this phase is skipped.
The exchange phase (EXCH) is used, depending on the selected mode, to exchange either Diffie- Hellman public values or nonces. The Diffie-Hellman shared secret will only be computed after the end of the exchanges.
The public values or nonces are authenticated during the authentication phase (AUTH), using the secret key established during the SHARE phase.
The messages from these three phases do not necessarily follow the order described above; in actual practice they are combined to minimize the number of exchanged messages.
References used for this question:
Source: KRUTZ, Ronald L. & VINES, Russel D., The CISSP Prep Guide: Mastering the Ten Domains of Computer Security, John Wiley & Sons, 2001, Chapter 4: Cryptography (page 172).
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4306
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4301
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_Key_Exchange
CISCO ISAKMP and OAKLEY information
CISCO Configuring Internet Key Exchange Protocol
http://www.hsc.fr/ressources/articles/ipsec-tech/index.html.en

NEW QUESTION: 4
A customer must perform trend analysis for future growth. Which product should be included in the design?
A. IBM System Director
B. IBM Tivoli Performance Analyzer
C. IBM Tivoli Monitoring Agent Builder
D. IBM Tivoli Common Reporting
Answer: B

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NEW QUESTION: 1
The theory of the 'Hawthorne Effect on Human Motivation' was given by:
A. Walter Shewhart
B. W. Edwards Deming
C. Joseph M. Juran
D. Frederick Herzberg
Answer: C

NEW QUESTION: 2
When trying to configure a Virtual Port Channel (vPC), what might be a cause of the following error when
trying to create the vPC domain?.
Nexus-5548-B(config)# vpc domain 10

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A. The vPC domain has already been configured
B. The vPC links have to be configured before the vPC domain can be added
C. vPC domain cannot be configured at the global prompt
D. Have not yet turned on the vpc feature using the 'feature vpc' command
Answer: D

NEW QUESTION: 3
What is the name of the protocol use to set up and manage Security Associations (SA) for IP Security (IPSec)?
A. Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
B. Secure Key Exchange Mechanism
C. Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol
D. Oakley
Answer: A
Explanation:
Explanation/Reference:
The Key management for IPSec is called the Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
Note: IKE underwent a series of improvements establishing IKEv2 with RFC 4306. The basis of this answer is IKEv2.
The IKE protocol is a hybrid of three other protocols: ISAKMP (Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol), Oakley and SKEME. ISAKMP provides a framework for authentication and key exchange, but does not define them (neither authentication nor key exchange). The Oakley protocol describes a series of modes for key exchange and the SKEME protocol defines key exchange techniques.
IKE-Internet Key Exchange. A hybrid protocol that implements Oakley and Skeme key exchanges inside the ISAKMP framework. IKE can be used with other protocols, but its initial implementation is with the IPSec protocol. IKE provides authentication of the IPSec peers, negotiates IPSec keys, and negotiates IPSec security associations.
IKE is implemented in accordance with RFC 2409, The Internet Key Exchange.
The Internet Key Exchange (IKE) security protocol is a key management protocol standard that is used in conjunction with the IPSec standard. IPSec can be configured without IKE, but IKE enhances IPSec by providing additional features, flexibility, and ease of configuration for the IPSec standard.
IKE is a hybrid protocol that implements the Oakley key exchange and the SKEME key exchange inside the Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) framework. (ISAKMP, Oakley, and SKEME are security protocols implemented by IKE.)
IKE automatically negotiates IPSec security associations (SAs) and enables IPSec secure communications without costly manual preconfiguration. Specifically, IKE provides these benefits:
*Eliminates the need to manually specify all the IPSec security parameters in the crypto maps at both peers.
*Allows you to specify a lifetime for the IPSec security association.
*Allows encryption keys to change during IPSec sessions.
*Allows IPSec to provide anti-replay services.
*Permits certification authority (CA) support for a manageable, scalable IPSec implementation.
*Allows dynamic authentication of peers.
About ISAKMP
The Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) is a framework that defines the phases for establishing a secure relationship and support for negotiation of security attributes, it does not establish sessions keys by itself, it is used along with the Oakley session key establishment protocol. The Secure Key Exchange Mechanism (SKEME) describes a secure exchange mechanism and Oakley defines the modes of operation needed to establish a secure connection.
ISAKMP provides a framework for Internet key management and provides the specific protocol support for negotiation of security attributes. Alone, it does not establish session keys. However it can be used with various session key establishment protocols, such as Oakley, to provide a complete solution to Internet key management.
About Oakley
The Oakley protocol uses a hybrid Diffie-Hellman technique to establish session keys on Internet hosts and routers. Oakley provides the important security property of Perfect Forward Secrecy (PFS) and is based on cryptographic techniques that have survived substantial public scrutiny. Oakley can be used by itself, if no attribute negotiation is needed, or Oakley can be used in conjunction with ISAKMP. When ISAKMP is used with Oakley, key escrow is not feasible.
The ISAKMP and Oakley protocols have been combined into a hybrid protocol. The resolution of ISAKMP with Oakley uses the framework of ISAKMP to support a subset of Oakley key exchange modes. This new key exchange protocol provides optional PFS, full security association attribute negotiation, and authentication methods that provide both repudiation and non-repudiation. Implementations of this protocol can be used to establish VPNs and also allow for users from remote sites (who may have a dynamically allocated IP address) access to a secure network.
About IPSec
The IETF's IPSec Working Group develops standards for IP-layer security mechanisms for both IPv4 and IPv6. The group also is developing generic key management protocols for use on the Internet. For more information, refer to the IP Security and Encryption Overview.
IPSec is a framework of open standards developed by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) that provides security for transmission of sensitive information over unprotected networks such as the Internet.
It acts at the network level and implements the following standards:
IPSec
Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
Data Encryption Standard (DES)
MD5 (HMAC variant)
SHA (HMAC variant)
Authentication Header (AH)
Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP)
IPSec services provide a robust security solution that is standards-based. IPSec also provides data authentication and anti-replay services in addition to data confidentiality services.
For more information regarding IPSec, refer to the chapter "Configuring IPSec Network Security." About SKEME
SKEME constitutes a compact protocol that supports a variety of realistic scenarios and security models over Internet. It provides clear tradeoffs between security and performance as required by the different scenarios without incurring in unnecessary system complexity. The protocol supports key exchange based on public key, key distribution centers, or manual installation, and provides for fast and secure key refreshment. In addition, SKEME selectively provides perfect forward secrecy, allows for replaceability and negotiation of the underlying cryptographic primitives, and addresses privacy issues as anonymity and repudiatability
SKEME's basic mode is based on the use of public keys and a Diffie-Hellman shared secret generation.
However, SKEME is not restricted to the use of public keys, but also allows the use of a pre-shared key.
This key can be obtained by manual distribution or by the intermediary of a key distribution center (KDC) such as Kerberos.
In short, SKEME contains four distinct modes:
Basic mode, which provides a key exchange based on public keys and ensures PFS thanks to Diffie- Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of public keys, but without Diffie-Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of a pre-shared key and on Diffie-Hellman.
A mechanism of fast rekeying based only on symmetrical algorithms.
In addition, SKEME is composed of three phases: SHARE, EXCH and AUTH.
During the SHARE phase, the peers exchange half-keys, encrypted with their respective public keys.
These two half-keys are used to compute a secret key K. If anonymity is wanted, the identities of the two peers are also encrypted. If a shared secret already exists, this phase is skipped.
The exchange phase (EXCH) is used, depending on the selected mode, to exchange either Diffie- Hellman public values or nonces. The Diffie-Hellman shared secret will only be computed after the end of the exchanges.
The public values or nonces are authenticated during the authentication phase (AUTH), using the secret key established during the SHARE phase.
The messages from these three phases do not necessarily follow the order described above; in actual practice they are combined to minimize the number of exchanged messages.
References used for this question:
Source: KRUTZ, Ronald L. & VINES, Russel D., The CISSP Prep Guide: Mastering the Ten Domains of Computer Security, John Wiley & Sons, 2001, Chapter 4: Cryptography (page 172).
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4306
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4301
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_Key_Exchange
CISCO ISAKMP and OAKLEY information
CISCO Configuring Internet Key Exchange Protocol
http://www.hsc.fr/ressources/articles/ipsec-tech/index.html.en

NEW QUESTION: 4
A customer must perform trend analysis for future growth. Which product should be included in the design?
A. IBM System Director
B. IBM Tivoli Performance Analyzer
C. IBM Tivoli Monitoring Agent Builder
D. IBM Tivoli Common Reporting
Answer: B

Dumps Questions by Experts

1. If you are not sure of the quality of our

' marker.Nexus-5548-B(config)#
A. The vPC domain has already been configured
B. The vPC links have to be configured before the vPC domain can be added
C. vPC domain cannot be configured at the global prompt
D. Have not yet turned on the vpc feature using the 'feature vpc' command
Answer: D

NEW QUESTION: 3
What is the name of the protocol use to set up and manage Security Associations (SA) for IP Security (IPSec)?
A. Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
B. Secure Key Exchange Mechanism
C. Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol
D. Oakley
Answer: A
Explanation:
Explanation/Reference:
The Key management for IPSec is called the Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
Note: IKE underwent a series of improvements establishing IKEv2 with RFC 4306. The basis of this answer is IKEv2.
The IKE protocol is a hybrid of three other protocols: ISAKMP (Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol), Oakley and SKEME. ISAKMP provides a framework for authentication and key exchange, but does not define them (neither authentication nor key exchange). The Oakley protocol describes a series of modes for key exchange and the SKEME protocol defines key exchange techniques.
IKE-Internet Key Exchange. A hybrid protocol that implements Oakley and Skeme key exchanges inside the ISAKMP framework. IKE can be used with other protocols, but its initial implementation is with the IPSec protocol. IKE provides authentication of the IPSec peers, negotiates IPSec keys, and negotiates IPSec security associations.
IKE is implemented in accordance with RFC 2409, The Internet Key Exchange.
The Internet Key Exchange (IKE) security protocol is a key management protocol standard that is used in conjunction with the IPSec standard. IPSec can be configured without IKE, but IKE enhances IPSec by providing additional features, flexibility, and ease of configuration for the IPSec standard.
IKE is a hybrid protocol that implements the Oakley key exchange and the SKEME key exchange inside the Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) framework. (ISAKMP, Oakley, and SKEME are security protocols implemented by IKE.)
IKE automatically negotiates IPSec security associations (SAs) and enables IPSec secure communications without costly manual preconfiguration. Specifically, IKE provides these benefits:
*Eliminates the need to manually specify all the IPSec security parameters in the crypto maps at both peers.
*Allows you to specify a lifetime for the IPSec security association.
*Allows encryption keys to change during IPSec sessions.
*Allows IPSec to provide anti-replay services.
*Permits certification authority (CA) support for a manageable, scalable IPSec implementation.
*Allows dynamic authentication of peers.
About ISAKMP
The Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) is a framework that defines the phases for establishing a secure relationship and support for negotiation of security attributes, it does not establish sessions keys by itself, it is used along with the Oakley session key establishment protocol. The Secure Key Exchange Mechanism (SKEME) describes a secure exchange mechanism and Oakley defines the modes of operation needed to establish a secure connection.
ISAKMP provides a framework for Internet key management and provides the specific protocol support for negotiation of security attributes. Alone, it does not establish session keys. However it can be used with various session key establishment protocols, such as Oakley, to provide a complete solution to Internet key management.
About Oakley
The Oakley protocol uses a hybrid Diffie-Hellman technique to establish session keys on Internet hosts and routers. Oakley provides the important security property of Perfect Forward Secrecy (PFS) and is based on cryptographic techniques that have survived substantial public scrutiny. Oakley can be used by itself, if no attribute negotiation is needed, or Oakley can be used in conjunction with ISAKMP. When ISAKMP is used with Oakley, key escrow is not feasible.
The ISAKMP and Oakley protocols have been combined into a hybrid protocol. The resolution of ISAKMP with Oakley uses the framework of ISAKMP to support a subset of Oakley key exchange modes. This new key exchange protocol provides optional PFS, full security association attribute negotiation, and authentication methods that provide both repudiation and non-repudiation. Implementations of this protocol can be used to establish VPNs and also allow for users from remote sites (who may have a dynamically allocated IP address) access to a secure network.
About IPSec
The IETF's IPSec Working Group develops standards for IP-layer security mechanisms for both IPv4 and IPv6. The group also is developing generic key management protocols for use on the Internet. For more information, refer to the IP Security and Encryption Overview.
IPSec is a framework of open standards developed by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) that provides security for transmission of sensitive information over unprotected networks such as the Internet.
It acts at the network level and implements the following standards:
IPSec
Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
Data Encryption Standard (DES)
MD5 (HMAC variant)
SHA (HMAC variant)
Authentication Header (AH)
Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP)
IPSec services provide a robust security solution that is standards-based. IPSec also provides data authentication and anti-replay services in addition to data confidentiality services.
For more information regarding IPSec, refer to the chapter "Configuring IPSec Network Security." About SKEME
SKEME constitutes a compact protocol that supports a variety of realistic scenarios and security models over Internet. It provides clear tradeoffs between security and performance as required by the different scenarios without incurring in unnecessary system complexity. The protocol supports key exchange based on public key, key distribution centers, or manual installation, and provides for fast and secure key refreshment. In addition, SKEME selectively provides perfect forward secrecy, allows for replaceability and negotiation of the underlying cryptographic primitives, and addresses privacy issues as anonymity and repudiatability
SKEME's basic mode is based on the use of public keys and a Diffie-Hellman shared secret generation.
However, SKEME is not restricted to the use of public keys, but also allows the use of a pre-shared key.
This key can be obtained by manual distribution or by the intermediary of a key distribution center (KDC) such as Kerberos.
In short, SKEME contains four distinct modes:
Basic mode, which provides a key exchange based on public keys and ensures PFS thanks to Diffie- Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of public keys, but without Diffie-Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of a pre-shared key and on Diffie-Hellman.
A mechanism of fast rekeying based only on symmetrical algorithms.
In addition, SKEME is composed of three phases: SHARE, EXCH and AUTH.
During the SHARE phase, the peers exchange half-keys, encrypted with their respective public keys.
These two half-keys are used to compute a secret key K. If anonymity is wanted, the identities of the two peers are also encrypted. If a shared secret already exists, this phase is skipped.
The exchange phase (EXCH) is used, depending on the selected mode, to exchange either Diffie- Hellman public values or nonces. The Diffie-Hellman shared secret will only be computed after the end of the exchanges.
The public values or nonces are authenticated during the authentication phase (AUTH), using the secret key established during the SHARE phase.
The messages from these three phases do not necessarily follow the order described above; in actual practice they are combined to minimize the number of exchanged messages.
References used for this question:
Source: KRUTZ, Ronald L. & VINES, Russel D., The CISSP Prep Guide: Mastering the Ten Domains of Computer Security, John Wiley & Sons, 2001, Chapter 4: Cryptography (page 172).
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4306
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4301
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_Key_Exchange
CISCO ISAKMP and OAKLEY information
CISCO Configuring Internet Key Exchange Protocol
http://www.hsc.fr/ressources/articles/ipsec-tech/index.html.en

NEW QUESTION: 4
A customer must perform trend analysis for future growth. Which product should be included in the design?
A. IBM System Director
B. IBM Tivoli Performance Analyzer
C. IBM Tivoli Monitoring Agent Builder
D. IBM Tivoli Common Reporting
Answer: B

product than you are free to download the H13-211_V1.0 ' marker.Nexus-5548-B(config)#
A. The vPC domain has already been configured
B. The vPC links have to be configured before the vPC domain can be added
C. vPC domain cannot be configured at the global prompt
D. Have not yet turned on the vpc feature using the 'feature vpc' command
Answer: D

NEW QUESTION: 3
What is the name of the protocol use to set up and manage Security Associations (SA) for IP Security (IPSec)?
A. Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
B. Secure Key Exchange Mechanism
C. Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol
D. Oakley
Answer: A
Explanation:
Explanation/Reference:
The Key management for IPSec is called the Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
Note: IKE underwent a series of improvements establishing IKEv2 with RFC 4306. The basis of this answer is IKEv2.
The IKE protocol is a hybrid of three other protocols: ISAKMP (Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol), Oakley and SKEME. ISAKMP provides a framework for authentication and key exchange, but does not define them (neither authentication nor key exchange). The Oakley protocol describes a series of modes for key exchange and the SKEME protocol defines key exchange techniques.
IKE-Internet Key Exchange. A hybrid protocol that implements Oakley and Skeme key exchanges inside the ISAKMP framework. IKE can be used with other protocols, but its initial implementation is with the IPSec protocol. IKE provides authentication of the IPSec peers, negotiates IPSec keys, and negotiates IPSec security associations.
IKE is implemented in accordance with RFC 2409, The Internet Key Exchange.
The Internet Key Exchange (IKE) security protocol is a key management protocol standard that is used in conjunction with the IPSec standard. IPSec can be configured without IKE, but IKE enhances IPSec by providing additional features, flexibility, and ease of configuration for the IPSec standard.
IKE is a hybrid protocol that implements the Oakley key exchange and the SKEME key exchange inside the Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) framework. (ISAKMP, Oakley, and SKEME are security protocols implemented by IKE.)
IKE automatically negotiates IPSec security associations (SAs) and enables IPSec secure communications without costly manual preconfiguration. Specifically, IKE provides these benefits:
*Eliminates the need to manually specify all the IPSec security parameters in the crypto maps at both peers.
*Allows you to specify a lifetime for the IPSec security association.
*Allows encryption keys to change during IPSec sessions.
*Allows IPSec to provide anti-replay services.
*Permits certification authority (CA) support for a manageable, scalable IPSec implementation.
*Allows dynamic authentication of peers.
About ISAKMP
The Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) is a framework that defines the phases for establishing a secure relationship and support for negotiation of security attributes, it does not establish sessions keys by itself, it is used along with the Oakley session key establishment protocol. The Secure Key Exchange Mechanism (SKEME) describes a secure exchange mechanism and Oakley defines the modes of operation needed to establish a secure connection.
ISAKMP provides a framework for Internet key management and provides the specific protocol support for negotiation of security attributes. Alone, it does not establish session keys. However it can be used with various session key establishment protocols, such as Oakley, to provide a complete solution to Internet key management.
About Oakley
The Oakley protocol uses a hybrid Diffie-Hellman technique to establish session keys on Internet hosts and routers. Oakley provides the important security property of Perfect Forward Secrecy (PFS) and is based on cryptographic techniques that have survived substantial public scrutiny. Oakley can be used by itself, if no attribute negotiation is needed, or Oakley can be used in conjunction with ISAKMP. When ISAKMP is used with Oakley, key escrow is not feasible.
The ISAKMP and Oakley protocols have been combined into a hybrid protocol. The resolution of ISAKMP with Oakley uses the framework of ISAKMP to support a subset of Oakley key exchange modes. This new key exchange protocol provides optional PFS, full security association attribute negotiation, and authentication methods that provide both repudiation and non-repudiation. Implementations of this protocol can be used to establish VPNs and also allow for users from remote sites (who may have a dynamically allocated IP address) access to a secure network.
About IPSec
The IETF's IPSec Working Group develops standards for IP-layer security mechanisms for both IPv4 and IPv6. The group also is developing generic key management protocols for use on the Internet. For more information, refer to the IP Security and Encryption Overview.
IPSec is a framework of open standards developed by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) that provides security for transmission of sensitive information over unprotected networks such as the Internet.
It acts at the network level and implements the following standards:
IPSec
Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
Data Encryption Standard (DES)
MD5 (HMAC variant)
SHA (HMAC variant)
Authentication Header (AH)
Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP)
IPSec services provide a robust security solution that is standards-based. IPSec also provides data authentication and anti-replay services in addition to data confidentiality services.
For more information regarding IPSec, refer to the chapter "Configuring IPSec Network Security." About SKEME
SKEME constitutes a compact protocol that supports a variety of realistic scenarios and security models over Internet. It provides clear tradeoffs between security and performance as required by the different scenarios without incurring in unnecessary system complexity. The protocol supports key exchange based on public key, key distribution centers, or manual installation, and provides for fast and secure key refreshment. In addition, SKEME selectively provides perfect forward secrecy, allows for replaceability and negotiation of the underlying cryptographic primitives, and addresses privacy issues as anonymity and repudiatability
SKEME's basic mode is based on the use of public keys and a Diffie-Hellman shared secret generation.
However, SKEME is not restricted to the use of public keys, but also allows the use of a pre-shared key.
This key can be obtained by manual distribution or by the intermediary of a key distribution center (KDC) such as Kerberos.
In short, SKEME contains four distinct modes:
Basic mode, which provides a key exchange based on public keys and ensures PFS thanks to Diffie- Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of public keys, but without Diffie-Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of a pre-shared key and on Diffie-Hellman.
A mechanism of fast rekeying based only on symmetrical algorithms.
In addition, SKEME is composed of three phases: SHARE, EXCH and AUTH.
During the SHARE phase, the peers exchange half-keys, encrypted with their respective public keys.
These two half-keys are used to compute a secret key K. If anonymity is wanted, the identities of the two peers are also encrypted. If a shared secret already exists, this phase is skipped.
The exchange phase (EXCH) is used, depending on the selected mode, to exchange either Diffie- Hellman public values or nonces. The Diffie-Hellman shared secret will only be computed after the end of the exchanges.
The public values or nonces are authenticated during the authentication phase (AUTH), using the secret key established during the SHARE phase.
The messages from these three phases do not necessarily follow the order described above; in actual practice they are combined to minimize the number of exchanged messages.
References used for this question:
Source: KRUTZ, Ronald L. & VINES, Russel D., The CISSP Prep Guide: Mastering the Ten Domains of Computer Security, John Wiley & Sons, 2001, Chapter 4: Cryptography (page 172).
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4306
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4301
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_Key_Exchange
CISCO ISAKMP and OAKLEY information
CISCO Configuring Internet Key Exchange Protocol
http://www.hsc.fr/ressources/articles/ipsec-tech/index.html.en

NEW QUESTION: 4
A customer must perform trend analysis for future growth. Which product should be included in the design?
A. IBM System Director
B. IBM Tivoli Performance Analyzer
C. IBM Tivoli Monitoring Agent Builder
D. IBM Tivoli Common Reporting
Answer: B

demo to verify your doubts

2. We provide ' marker.Nexus-5548-B(config)#
A. The vPC domain has already been configured
B. The vPC links have to be configured before the vPC domain can be added
C. vPC domain cannot be configured at the global prompt
D. Have not yet turned on the vpc feature using the 'feature vpc' command
Answer: D

NEW QUESTION: 3
What is the name of the protocol use to set up and manage Security Associations (SA) for IP Security (IPSec)?
A. Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
B. Secure Key Exchange Mechanism
C. Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol
D. Oakley
Answer: A
Explanation:
Explanation/Reference:
The Key management for IPSec is called the Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
Note: IKE underwent a series of improvements establishing IKEv2 with RFC 4306. The basis of this answer is IKEv2.
The IKE protocol is a hybrid of three other protocols: ISAKMP (Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol), Oakley and SKEME. ISAKMP provides a framework for authentication and key exchange, but does not define them (neither authentication nor key exchange). The Oakley protocol describes a series of modes for key exchange and the SKEME protocol defines key exchange techniques.
IKE-Internet Key Exchange. A hybrid protocol that implements Oakley and Skeme key exchanges inside the ISAKMP framework. IKE can be used with other protocols, but its initial implementation is with the IPSec protocol. IKE provides authentication of the IPSec peers, negotiates IPSec keys, and negotiates IPSec security associations.
IKE is implemented in accordance with RFC 2409, The Internet Key Exchange.
The Internet Key Exchange (IKE) security protocol is a key management protocol standard that is used in conjunction with the IPSec standard. IPSec can be configured without IKE, but IKE enhances IPSec by providing additional features, flexibility, and ease of configuration for the IPSec standard.
IKE is a hybrid protocol that implements the Oakley key exchange and the SKEME key exchange inside the Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) framework. (ISAKMP, Oakley, and SKEME are security protocols implemented by IKE.)
IKE automatically negotiates IPSec security associations (SAs) and enables IPSec secure communications without costly manual preconfiguration. Specifically, IKE provides these benefits:
*Eliminates the need to manually specify all the IPSec security parameters in the crypto maps at both peers.
*Allows you to specify a lifetime for the IPSec security association.
*Allows encryption keys to change during IPSec sessions.
*Allows IPSec to provide anti-replay services.
*Permits certification authority (CA) support for a manageable, scalable IPSec implementation.
*Allows dynamic authentication of peers.
About ISAKMP
The Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) is a framework that defines the phases for establishing a secure relationship and support for negotiation of security attributes, it does not establish sessions keys by itself, it is used along with the Oakley session key establishment protocol. The Secure Key Exchange Mechanism (SKEME) describes a secure exchange mechanism and Oakley defines the modes of operation needed to establish a secure connection.
ISAKMP provides a framework for Internet key management and provides the specific protocol support for negotiation of security attributes. Alone, it does not establish session keys. However it can be used with various session key establishment protocols, such as Oakley, to provide a complete solution to Internet key management.
About Oakley
The Oakley protocol uses a hybrid Diffie-Hellman technique to establish session keys on Internet hosts and routers. Oakley provides the important security property of Perfect Forward Secrecy (PFS) and is based on cryptographic techniques that have survived substantial public scrutiny. Oakley can be used by itself, if no attribute negotiation is needed, or Oakley can be used in conjunction with ISAKMP. When ISAKMP is used with Oakley, key escrow is not feasible.
The ISAKMP and Oakley protocols have been combined into a hybrid protocol. The resolution of ISAKMP with Oakley uses the framework of ISAKMP to support a subset of Oakley key exchange modes. This new key exchange protocol provides optional PFS, full security association attribute negotiation, and authentication methods that provide both repudiation and non-repudiation. Implementations of this protocol can be used to establish VPNs and also allow for users from remote sites (who may have a dynamically allocated IP address) access to a secure network.
About IPSec
The IETF's IPSec Working Group develops standards for IP-layer security mechanisms for both IPv4 and IPv6. The group also is developing generic key management protocols for use on the Internet. For more information, refer to the IP Security and Encryption Overview.
IPSec is a framework of open standards developed by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) that provides security for transmission of sensitive information over unprotected networks such as the Internet.
It acts at the network level and implements the following standards:
IPSec
Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
Data Encryption Standard (DES)
MD5 (HMAC variant)
SHA (HMAC variant)
Authentication Header (AH)
Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP)
IPSec services provide a robust security solution that is standards-based. IPSec also provides data authentication and anti-replay services in addition to data confidentiality services.
For more information regarding IPSec, refer to the chapter "Configuring IPSec Network Security." About SKEME
SKEME constitutes a compact protocol that supports a variety of realistic scenarios and security models over Internet. It provides clear tradeoffs between security and performance as required by the different scenarios without incurring in unnecessary system complexity. The protocol supports key exchange based on public key, key distribution centers, or manual installation, and provides for fast and secure key refreshment. In addition, SKEME selectively provides perfect forward secrecy, allows for replaceability and negotiation of the underlying cryptographic primitives, and addresses privacy issues as anonymity and repudiatability
SKEME's basic mode is based on the use of public keys and a Diffie-Hellman shared secret generation.
However, SKEME is not restricted to the use of public keys, but also allows the use of a pre-shared key.
This key can be obtained by manual distribution or by the intermediary of a key distribution center (KDC) such as Kerberos.
In short, SKEME contains four distinct modes:
Basic mode, which provides a key exchange based on public keys and ensures PFS thanks to Diffie- Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of public keys, but without Diffie-Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of a pre-shared key and on Diffie-Hellman.
A mechanism of fast rekeying based only on symmetrical algorithms.
In addition, SKEME is composed of three phases: SHARE, EXCH and AUTH.
During the SHARE phase, the peers exchange half-keys, encrypted with their respective public keys.
These two half-keys are used to compute a secret key K. If anonymity is wanted, the identities of the two peers are also encrypted. If a shared secret already exists, this phase is skipped.
The exchange phase (EXCH) is used, depending on the selected mode, to exchange either Diffie- Hellman public values or nonces. The Diffie-Hellman shared secret will only be computed after the end of the exchanges.
The public values or nonces are authenticated during the authentication phase (AUTH), using the secret key established during the SHARE phase.
The messages from these three phases do not necessarily follow the order described above; in actual practice they are combined to minimize the number of exchanged messages.
References used for this question:
Source: KRUTZ, Ronald L. & VINES, Russel D., The CISSP Prep Guide: Mastering the Ten Domains of Computer Security, John Wiley & Sons, 2001, Chapter 4: Cryptography (page 172).
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4306
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4301
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_Key_Exchange
CISCO ISAKMP and OAKLEY information
CISCO Configuring Internet Key Exchange Protocol
http://www.hsc.fr/ressources/articles/ipsec-tech/index.html.en

NEW QUESTION: 4
A customer must perform trend analysis for future growth. Which product should be included in the design?
A. IBM System Director
B. IBM Tivoli Performance Analyzer
C. IBM Tivoli Monitoring Agent Builder
D. IBM Tivoli Common Reporting
Answer: B

easy to understand and learn question so you can grasp the main points of the upcoming exam.

3. Dumps Questions strives to produce content that will prove to be vital for your preparation of (' marker.Nexus-5548-B(config)#
A. The vPC domain has already been configured
B. The vPC links have to be configured before the vPC domain can be added
C. vPC domain cannot be configured at the global prompt
D. Have not yet turned on the vpc feature using the 'feature vpc' command
Answer: D

NEW QUESTION: 3
What is the name of the protocol use to set up and manage Security Associations (SA) for IP Security (IPSec)?
A. Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
B. Secure Key Exchange Mechanism
C. Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol
D. Oakley
Answer: A
Explanation:
Explanation/Reference:
The Key management for IPSec is called the Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
Note: IKE underwent a series of improvements establishing IKEv2 with RFC 4306. The basis of this answer is IKEv2.
The IKE protocol is a hybrid of three other protocols: ISAKMP (Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol), Oakley and SKEME. ISAKMP provides a framework for authentication and key exchange, but does not define them (neither authentication nor key exchange). The Oakley protocol describes a series of modes for key exchange and the SKEME protocol defines key exchange techniques.
IKE-Internet Key Exchange. A hybrid protocol that implements Oakley and Skeme key exchanges inside the ISAKMP framework. IKE can be used with other protocols, but its initial implementation is with the IPSec protocol. IKE provides authentication of the IPSec peers, negotiates IPSec keys, and negotiates IPSec security associations.
IKE is implemented in accordance with RFC 2409, The Internet Key Exchange.
The Internet Key Exchange (IKE) security protocol is a key management protocol standard that is used in conjunction with the IPSec standard. IPSec can be configured without IKE, but IKE enhances IPSec by providing additional features, flexibility, and ease of configuration for the IPSec standard.
IKE is a hybrid protocol that implements the Oakley key exchange and the SKEME key exchange inside the Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) framework. (ISAKMP, Oakley, and SKEME are security protocols implemented by IKE.)
IKE automatically negotiates IPSec security associations (SAs) and enables IPSec secure communications without costly manual preconfiguration. Specifically, IKE provides these benefits:
*Eliminates the need to manually specify all the IPSec security parameters in the crypto maps at both peers.
*Allows you to specify a lifetime for the IPSec security association.
*Allows encryption keys to change during IPSec sessions.
*Allows IPSec to provide anti-replay services.
*Permits certification authority (CA) support for a manageable, scalable IPSec implementation.
*Allows dynamic authentication of peers.
About ISAKMP
The Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) is a framework that defines the phases for establishing a secure relationship and support for negotiation of security attributes, it does not establish sessions keys by itself, it is used along with the Oakley session key establishment protocol. The Secure Key Exchange Mechanism (SKEME) describes a secure exchange mechanism and Oakley defines the modes of operation needed to establish a secure connection.
ISAKMP provides a framework for Internet key management and provides the specific protocol support for negotiation of security attributes. Alone, it does not establish session keys. However it can be used with various session key establishment protocols, such as Oakley, to provide a complete solution to Internet key management.
About Oakley
The Oakley protocol uses a hybrid Diffie-Hellman technique to establish session keys on Internet hosts and routers. Oakley provides the important security property of Perfect Forward Secrecy (PFS) and is based on cryptographic techniques that have survived substantial public scrutiny. Oakley can be used by itself, if no attribute negotiation is needed, or Oakley can be used in conjunction with ISAKMP. When ISAKMP is used with Oakley, key escrow is not feasible.
The ISAKMP and Oakley protocols have been combined into a hybrid protocol. The resolution of ISAKMP with Oakley uses the framework of ISAKMP to support a subset of Oakley key exchange modes. This new key exchange protocol provides optional PFS, full security association attribute negotiation, and authentication methods that provide both repudiation and non-repudiation. Implementations of this protocol can be used to establish VPNs and also allow for users from remote sites (who may have a dynamically allocated IP address) access to a secure network.
About IPSec
The IETF's IPSec Working Group develops standards for IP-layer security mechanisms for both IPv4 and IPv6. The group also is developing generic key management protocols for use on the Internet. For more information, refer to the IP Security and Encryption Overview.
IPSec is a framework of open standards developed by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) that provides security for transmission of sensitive information over unprotected networks such as the Internet.
It acts at the network level and implements the following standards:
IPSec
Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
Data Encryption Standard (DES)
MD5 (HMAC variant)
SHA (HMAC variant)
Authentication Header (AH)
Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP)
IPSec services provide a robust security solution that is standards-based. IPSec also provides data authentication and anti-replay services in addition to data confidentiality services.
For more information regarding IPSec, refer to the chapter "Configuring IPSec Network Security." About SKEME
SKEME constitutes a compact protocol that supports a variety of realistic scenarios and security models over Internet. It provides clear tradeoffs between security and performance as required by the different scenarios without incurring in unnecessary system complexity. The protocol supports key exchange based on public key, key distribution centers, or manual installation, and provides for fast and secure key refreshment. In addition, SKEME selectively provides perfect forward secrecy, allows for replaceability and negotiation of the underlying cryptographic primitives, and addresses privacy issues as anonymity and repudiatability
SKEME's basic mode is based on the use of public keys and a Diffie-Hellman shared secret generation.
However, SKEME is not restricted to the use of public keys, but also allows the use of a pre-shared key.
This key can be obtained by manual distribution or by the intermediary of a key distribution center (KDC) such as Kerberos.
In short, SKEME contains four distinct modes:
Basic mode, which provides a key exchange based on public keys and ensures PFS thanks to Diffie- Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of public keys, but without Diffie-Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of a pre-shared key and on Diffie-Hellman.
A mechanism of fast rekeying based only on symmetrical algorithms.
In addition, SKEME is composed of three phases: SHARE, EXCH and AUTH.
During the SHARE phase, the peers exchange half-keys, encrypted with their respective public keys.
These two half-keys are used to compute a secret key K. If anonymity is wanted, the identities of the two peers are also encrypted. If a shared secret already exists, this phase is skipped.
The exchange phase (EXCH) is used, depending on the selected mode, to exchange either Diffie- Hellman public values or nonces. The Diffie-Hellman shared secret will only be computed after the end of the exchanges.
The public values or nonces are authenticated during the authentication phase (AUTH), using the secret key established during the SHARE phase.
The messages from these three phases do not necessarily follow the order described above; in actual practice they are combined to minimize the number of exchanged messages.
References used for this question:
Source: KRUTZ, Ronald L. & VINES, Russel D., The CISSP Prep Guide: Mastering the Ten Domains of Computer Security, John Wiley & Sons, 2001, Chapter 4: Cryptography (page 172).
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4306
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4301
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_Key_Exchange
CISCO ISAKMP and OAKLEY information
CISCO Configuring Internet Key Exchange Protocol
http://www.hsc.fr/ressources/articles/ipsec-tech/index.html.en

NEW QUESTION: 4
A customer must perform trend analysis for future growth. Which product should be included in the design?
A. IBM System Director
B. IBM Tivoli Performance Analyzer
C. IBM Tivoli Monitoring Agent Builder
D. IBM Tivoli Common Reporting
Answer: B

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4. You are guaranteed a perfect score in ' marker.Nexus-5548-B(config)#
A. The vPC domain has already been configured
B. The vPC links have to be configured before the vPC domain can be added
C. vPC domain cannot be configured at the global prompt
D. Have not yet turned on the vpc feature using the 'feature vpc' command
Answer: D

NEW QUESTION: 3
What is the name of the protocol use to set up and manage Security Associations (SA) for IP Security (IPSec)?
A. Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
B. Secure Key Exchange Mechanism
C. Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol
D. Oakley
Answer: A
Explanation:
Explanation/Reference:
The Key management for IPSec is called the Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
Note: IKE underwent a series of improvements establishing IKEv2 with RFC 4306. The basis of this answer is IKEv2.
The IKE protocol is a hybrid of three other protocols: ISAKMP (Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol), Oakley and SKEME. ISAKMP provides a framework for authentication and key exchange, but does not define them (neither authentication nor key exchange). The Oakley protocol describes a series of modes for key exchange and the SKEME protocol defines key exchange techniques.
IKE-Internet Key Exchange. A hybrid protocol that implements Oakley and Skeme key exchanges inside the ISAKMP framework. IKE can be used with other protocols, but its initial implementation is with the IPSec protocol. IKE provides authentication of the IPSec peers, negotiates IPSec keys, and negotiates IPSec security associations.
IKE is implemented in accordance with RFC 2409, The Internet Key Exchange.
The Internet Key Exchange (IKE) security protocol is a key management protocol standard that is used in conjunction with the IPSec standard. IPSec can be configured without IKE, but IKE enhances IPSec by providing additional features, flexibility, and ease of configuration for the IPSec standard.
IKE is a hybrid protocol that implements the Oakley key exchange and the SKEME key exchange inside the Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) framework. (ISAKMP, Oakley, and SKEME are security protocols implemented by IKE.)
IKE automatically negotiates IPSec security associations (SAs) and enables IPSec secure communications without costly manual preconfiguration. Specifically, IKE provides these benefits:
*Eliminates the need to manually specify all the IPSec security parameters in the crypto maps at both peers.
*Allows you to specify a lifetime for the IPSec security association.
*Allows encryption keys to change during IPSec sessions.
*Allows IPSec to provide anti-replay services.
*Permits certification authority (CA) support for a manageable, scalable IPSec implementation.
*Allows dynamic authentication of peers.
About ISAKMP
The Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) is a framework that defines the phases for establishing a secure relationship and support for negotiation of security attributes, it does not establish sessions keys by itself, it is used along with the Oakley session key establishment protocol. The Secure Key Exchange Mechanism (SKEME) describes a secure exchange mechanism and Oakley defines the modes of operation needed to establish a secure connection.
ISAKMP provides a framework for Internet key management and provides the specific protocol support for negotiation of security attributes. Alone, it does not establish session keys. However it can be used with various session key establishment protocols, such as Oakley, to provide a complete solution to Internet key management.
About Oakley
The Oakley protocol uses a hybrid Diffie-Hellman technique to establish session keys on Internet hosts and routers. Oakley provides the important security property of Perfect Forward Secrecy (PFS) and is based on cryptographic techniques that have survived substantial public scrutiny. Oakley can be used by itself, if no attribute negotiation is needed, or Oakley can be used in conjunction with ISAKMP. When ISAKMP is used with Oakley, key escrow is not feasible.
The ISAKMP and Oakley protocols have been combined into a hybrid protocol. The resolution of ISAKMP with Oakley uses the framework of ISAKMP to support a subset of Oakley key exchange modes. This new key exchange protocol provides optional PFS, full security association attribute negotiation, and authentication methods that provide both repudiation and non-repudiation. Implementations of this protocol can be used to establish VPNs and also allow for users from remote sites (who may have a dynamically allocated IP address) access to a secure network.
About IPSec
The IETF's IPSec Working Group develops standards for IP-layer security mechanisms for both IPv4 and IPv6. The group also is developing generic key management protocols for use on the Internet. For more information, refer to the IP Security and Encryption Overview.
IPSec is a framework of open standards developed by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) that provides security for transmission of sensitive information over unprotected networks such as the Internet.
It acts at the network level and implements the following standards:
IPSec
Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
Data Encryption Standard (DES)
MD5 (HMAC variant)
SHA (HMAC variant)
Authentication Header (AH)
Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP)
IPSec services provide a robust security solution that is standards-based. IPSec also provides data authentication and anti-replay services in addition to data confidentiality services.
For more information regarding IPSec, refer to the chapter "Configuring IPSec Network Security." About SKEME
SKEME constitutes a compact protocol that supports a variety of realistic scenarios and security models over Internet. It provides clear tradeoffs between security and performance as required by the different scenarios without incurring in unnecessary system complexity. The protocol supports key exchange based on public key, key distribution centers, or manual installation, and provides for fast and secure key refreshment. In addition, SKEME selectively provides perfect forward secrecy, allows for replaceability and negotiation of the underlying cryptographic primitives, and addresses privacy issues as anonymity and repudiatability
SKEME's basic mode is based on the use of public keys and a Diffie-Hellman shared secret generation.
However, SKEME is not restricted to the use of public keys, but also allows the use of a pre-shared key.
This key can be obtained by manual distribution or by the intermediary of a key distribution center (KDC) such as Kerberos.
In short, SKEME contains four distinct modes:
Basic mode, which provides a key exchange based on public keys and ensures PFS thanks to Diffie- Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of public keys, but without Diffie-Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of a pre-shared key and on Diffie-Hellman.
A mechanism of fast rekeying based only on symmetrical algorithms.
In addition, SKEME is composed of three phases: SHARE, EXCH and AUTH.
During the SHARE phase, the peers exchange half-keys, encrypted with their respective public keys.
These two half-keys are used to compute a secret key K. If anonymity is wanted, the identities of the two peers are also encrypted. If a shared secret already exists, this phase is skipped.
The exchange phase (EXCH) is used, depending on the selected mode, to exchange either Diffie- Hellman public values or nonces. The Diffie-Hellman shared secret will only be computed after the end of the exchanges.
The public values or nonces are authenticated during the authentication phase (AUTH), using the secret key established during the SHARE phase.
The messages from these three phases do not necessarily follow the order described above; in actual practice they are combined to minimize the number of exchanged messages.
References used for this question:
Source: KRUTZ, Ronald L. & VINES, Russel D., The CISSP Prep Guide: Mastering the Ten Domains of Computer Security, John Wiley & Sons, 2001, Chapter 4: Cryptography (page 172).
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4306
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4301
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_Key_Exchange
CISCO ISAKMP and OAKLEY information
CISCO Configuring Internet Key Exchange Protocol
http://www.hsc.fr/ressources/articles/ipsec-tech/index.html.en

NEW QUESTION: 4
A customer must perform trend analysis for future growth. Which product should be included in the design?
A. IBM System Director
B. IBM Tivoli Performance Analyzer
C. IBM Tivoli Monitoring Agent Builder
D. IBM Tivoli Common Reporting
Answer: B

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A. The vPC domain has already been configured
B. The vPC links have to be configured before the vPC domain can be added
C. vPC domain cannot be configured at the global prompt
D. Have not yet turned on the vpc feature using the 'feature vpc' command
Answer: D

NEW QUESTION: 3
What is the name of the protocol use to set up and manage Security Associations (SA) for IP Security (IPSec)?
A. Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
B. Secure Key Exchange Mechanism
C. Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol
D. Oakley
Answer: A
Explanation:
Explanation/Reference:
The Key management for IPSec is called the Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
Note: IKE underwent a series of improvements establishing IKEv2 with RFC 4306. The basis of this answer is IKEv2.
The IKE protocol is a hybrid of three other protocols: ISAKMP (Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol), Oakley and SKEME. ISAKMP provides a framework for authentication and key exchange, but does not define them (neither authentication nor key exchange). The Oakley protocol describes a series of modes for key exchange and the SKEME protocol defines key exchange techniques.
IKE-Internet Key Exchange. A hybrid protocol that implements Oakley and Skeme key exchanges inside the ISAKMP framework. IKE can be used with other protocols, but its initial implementation is with the IPSec protocol. IKE provides authentication of the IPSec peers, negotiates IPSec keys, and negotiates IPSec security associations.
IKE is implemented in accordance with RFC 2409, The Internet Key Exchange.
The Internet Key Exchange (IKE) security protocol is a key management protocol standard that is used in conjunction with the IPSec standard. IPSec can be configured without IKE, but IKE enhances IPSec by providing additional features, flexibility, and ease of configuration for the IPSec standard.
IKE is a hybrid protocol that implements the Oakley key exchange and the SKEME key exchange inside the Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) framework. (ISAKMP, Oakley, and SKEME are security protocols implemented by IKE.)
IKE automatically negotiates IPSec security associations (SAs) and enables IPSec secure communications without costly manual preconfiguration. Specifically, IKE provides these benefits:
*Eliminates the need to manually specify all the IPSec security parameters in the crypto maps at both peers.
*Allows you to specify a lifetime for the IPSec security association.
*Allows encryption keys to change during IPSec sessions.
*Allows IPSec to provide anti-replay services.
*Permits certification authority (CA) support for a manageable, scalable IPSec implementation.
*Allows dynamic authentication of peers.
About ISAKMP
The Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) is a framework that defines the phases for establishing a secure relationship and support for negotiation of security attributes, it does not establish sessions keys by itself, it is used along with the Oakley session key establishment protocol. The Secure Key Exchange Mechanism (SKEME) describes a secure exchange mechanism and Oakley defines the modes of operation needed to establish a secure connection.
ISAKMP provides a framework for Internet key management and provides the specific protocol support for negotiation of security attributes. Alone, it does not establish session keys. However it can be used with various session key establishment protocols, such as Oakley, to provide a complete solution to Internet key management.
About Oakley
The Oakley protocol uses a hybrid Diffie-Hellman technique to establish session keys on Internet hosts and routers. Oakley provides the important security property of Perfect Forward Secrecy (PFS) and is based on cryptographic techniques that have survived substantial public scrutiny. Oakley can be used by itself, if no attribute negotiation is needed, or Oakley can be used in conjunction with ISAKMP. When ISAKMP is used with Oakley, key escrow is not feasible.
The ISAKMP and Oakley protocols have been combined into a hybrid protocol. The resolution of ISAKMP with Oakley uses the framework of ISAKMP to support a subset of Oakley key exchange modes. This new key exchange protocol provides optional PFS, full security association attribute negotiation, and authentication methods that provide both repudiation and non-repudiation. Implementations of this protocol can be used to establish VPNs and also allow for users from remote sites (who may have a dynamically allocated IP address) access to a secure network.
About IPSec
The IETF's IPSec Working Group develops standards for IP-layer security mechanisms for both IPv4 and IPv6. The group also is developing generic key management protocols for use on the Internet. For more information, refer to the IP Security and Encryption Overview.
IPSec is a framework of open standards developed by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) that provides security for transmission of sensitive information over unprotected networks such as the Internet.
It acts at the network level and implements the following standards:
IPSec
Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
Data Encryption Standard (DES)
MD5 (HMAC variant)
SHA (HMAC variant)
Authentication Header (AH)
Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP)
IPSec services provide a robust security solution that is standards-based. IPSec also provides data authentication and anti-replay services in addition to data confidentiality services.
For more information regarding IPSec, refer to the chapter "Configuring IPSec Network Security." About SKEME
SKEME constitutes a compact protocol that supports a variety of realistic scenarios and security models over Internet. It provides clear tradeoffs between security and performance as required by the different scenarios without incurring in unnecessary system complexity. The protocol supports key exchange based on public key, key distribution centers, or manual installation, and provides for fast and secure key refreshment. In addition, SKEME selectively provides perfect forward secrecy, allows for replaceability and negotiation of the underlying cryptographic primitives, and addresses privacy issues as anonymity and repudiatability
SKEME's basic mode is based on the use of public keys and a Diffie-Hellman shared secret generation.
However, SKEME is not restricted to the use of public keys, but also allows the use of a pre-shared key.
This key can be obtained by manual distribution or by the intermediary of a key distribution center (KDC) such as Kerberos.
In short, SKEME contains four distinct modes:
Basic mode, which provides a key exchange based on public keys and ensures PFS thanks to Diffie- Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of public keys, but without Diffie-Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of a pre-shared key and on Diffie-Hellman.
A mechanism of fast rekeying based only on symmetrical algorithms.
In addition, SKEME is composed of three phases: SHARE, EXCH and AUTH.
During the SHARE phase, the peers exchange half-keys, encrypted with their respective public keys.
These two half-keys are used to compute a secret key K. If anonymity is wanted, the identities of the two peers are also encrypted. If a shared secret already exists, this phase is skipped.
The exchange phase (EXCH) is used, depending on the selected mode, to exchange either Diffie- Hellman public values or nonces. The Diffie-Hellman shared secret will only be computed after the end of the exchanges.
The public values or nonces are authenticated during the authentication phase (AUTH), using the secret key established during the SHARE phase.
The messages from these three phases do not necessarily follow the order described above; in actual practice they are combined to minimize the number of exchanged messages.
References used for this question:
Source: KRUTZ, Ronald L. & VINES, Russel D., The CISSP Prep Guide: Mastering the Ten Domains of Computer Security, John Wiley & Sons, 2001, Chapter 4: Cryptography (page 172).
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4306
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4301
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_Key_Exchange
CISCO ISAKMP and OAKLEY information
CISCO Configuring Internet Key Exchange Protocol
http://www.hsc.fr/ressources/articles/ipsec-tech/index.html.en

NEW QUESTION: 4
A customer must perform trend analysis for future growth. Which product should be included in the design?
A. IBM System Director
B. IBM Tivoli Performance Analyzer
C. IBM Tivoli Monitoring Agent Builder
D. IBM Tivoli Common Reporting
Answer: B

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A. The vPC domain has already been configured
B. The vPC links have to be configured before the vPC domain can be added
C. vPC domain cannot be configured at the global prompt
D. Have not yet turned on the vpc feature using the 'feature vpc' command
Answer: D

NEW QUESTION: 3
What is the name of the protocol use to set up and manage Security Associations (SA) for IP Security (IPSec)?
A. Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
B. Secure Key Exchange Mechanism
C. Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol
D. Oakley
Answer: A
Explanation:
Explanation/Reference:
The Key management for IPSec is called the Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
Note: IKE underwent a series of improvements establishing IKEv2 with RFC 4306. The basis of this answer is IKEv2.
The IKE protocol is a hybrid of three other protocols: ISAKMP (Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol), Oakley and SKEME. ISAKMP provides a framework for authentication and key exchange, but does not define them (neither authentication nor key exchange). The Oakley protocol describes a series of modes for key exchange and the SKEME protocol defines key exchange techniques.
IKE-Internet Key Exchange. A hybrid protocol that implements Oakley and Skeme key exchanges inside the ISAKMP framework. IKE can be used with other protocols, but its initial implementation is with the IPSec protocol. IKE provides authentication of the IPSec peers, negotiates IPSec keys, and negotiates IPSec security associations.
IKE is implemented in accordance with RFC 2409, The Internet Key Exchange.
The Internet Key Exchange (IKE) security protocol is a key management protocol standard that is used in conjunction with the IPSec standard. IPSec can be configured without IKE, but IKE enhances IPSec by providing additional features, flexibility, and ease of configuration for the IPSec standard.
IKE is a hybrid protocol that implements the Oakley key exchange and the SKEME key exchange inside the Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) framework. (ISAKMP, Oakley, and SKEME are security protocols implemented by IKE.)
IKE automatically negotiates IPSec security associations (SAs) and enables IPSec secure communications without costly manual preconfiguration. Specifically, IKE provides these benefits:
*Eliminates the need to manually specify all the IPSec security parameters in the crypto maps at both peers.
*Allows you to specify a lifetime for the IPSec security association.
*Allows encryption keys to change during IPSec sessions.
*Allows IPSec to provide anti-replay services.
*Permits certification authority (CA) support for a manageable, scalable IPSec implementation.
*Allows dynamic authentication of peers.
About ISAKMP
The Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) is a framework that defines the phases for establishing a secure relationship and support for negotiation of security attributes, it does not establish sessions keys by itself, it is used along with the Oakley session key establishment protocol. The Secure Key Exchange Mechanism (SKEME) describes a secure exchange mechanism and Oakley defines the modes of operation needed to establish a secure connection.
ISAKMP provides a framework for Internet key management and provides the specific protocol support for negotiation of security attributes. Alone, it does not establish session keys. However it can be used with various session key establishment protocols, such as Oakley, to provide a complete solution to Internet key management.
About Oakley
The Oakley protocol uses a hybrid Diffie-Hellman technique to establish session keys on Internet hosts and routers. Oakley provides the important security property of Perfect Forward Secrecy (PFS) and is based on cryptographic techniques that have survived substantial public scrutiny. Oakley can be used by itself, if no attribute negotiation is needed, or Oakley can be used in conjunction with ISAKMP. When ISAKMP is used with Oakley, key escrow is not feasible.
The ISAKMP and Oakley protocols have been combined into a hybrid protocol. The resolution of ISAKMP with Oakley uses the framework of ISAKMP to support a subset of Oakley key exchange modes. This new key exchange protocol provides optional PFS, full security association attribute negotiation, and authentication methods that provide both repudiation and non-repudiation. Implementations of this protocol can be used to establish VPNs and also allow for users from remote sites (who may have a dynamically allocated IP address) access to a secure network.
About IPSec
The IETF's IPSec Working Group develops standards for IP-layer security mechanisms for both IPv4 and IPv6. The group also is developing generic key management protocols for use on the Internet. For more information, refer to the IP Security and Encryption Overview.
IPSec is a framework of open standards developed by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) that provides security for transmission of sensitive information over unprotected networks such as the Internet.
It acts at the network level and implements the following standards:
IPSec
Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
Data Encryption Standard (DES)
MD5 (HMAC variant)
SHA (HMAC variant)
Authentication Header (AH)
Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP)
IPSec services provide a robust security solution that is standards-based. IPSec also provides data authentication and anti-replay services in addition to data confidentiality services.
For more information regarding IPSec, refer to the chapter "Configuring IPSec Network Security." About SKEME
SKEME constitutes a compact protocol that supports a variety of realistic scenarios and security models over Internet. It provides clear tradeoffs between security and performance as required by the different scenarios without incurring in unnecessary system complexity. The protocol supports key exchange based on public key, key distribution centers, or manual installation, and provides for fast and secure key refreshment. In addition, SKEME selectively provides perfect forward secrecy, allows for replaceability and negotiation of the underlying cryptographic primitives, and addresses privacy issues as anonymity and repudiatability
SKEME's basic mode is based on the use of public keys and a Diffie-Hellman shared secret generation.
However, SKEME is not restricted to the use of public keys, but also allows the use of a pre-shared key.
This key can be obtained by manual distribution or by the intermediary of a key distribution center (KDC) such as Kerberos.
In short, SKEME contains four distinct modes:
Basic mode, which provides a key exchange based on public keys and ensures PFS thanks to Diffie- Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of public keys, but without Diffie-Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of a pre-shared key and on Diffie-Hellman.
A mechanism of fast rekeying based only on symmetrical algorithms.
In addition, SKEME is composed of three phases: SHARE, EXCH and AUTH.
During the SHARE phase, the peers exchange half-keys, encrypted with their respective public keys.
These two half-keys are used to compute a secret key K. If anonymity is wanted, the identities of the two peers are also encrypted. If a shared secret already exists, this phase is skipped.
The exchange phase (EXCH) is used, depending on the selected mode, to exchange either Diffie- Hellman public values or nonces. The Diffie-Hellman shared secret will only be computed after the end of the exchanges.
The public values or nonces are authenticated during the authentication phase (AUTH), using the secret key established during the SHARE phase.
The messages from these three phases do not necessarily follow the order described above; in actual practice they are combined to minimize the number of exchanged messages.
References used for this question:
Source: KRUTZ, Ronald L. & VINES, Russel D., The CISSP Prep Guide: Mastering the Ten Domains of Computer Security, John Wiley & Sons, 2001, Chapter 4: Cryptography (page 172).
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4306
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4301
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_Key_Exchange
CISCO ISAKMP and OAKLEY information
CISCO Configuring Internet Key Exchange Protocol
http://www.hsc.fr/ressources/articles/ipsec-tech/index.html.en

NEW QUESTION: 4
A customer must perform trend analysis for future growth. Which product should be included in the design?
A. IBM System Director
B. IBM Tivoli Performance Analyzer
C. IBM Tivoli Monitoring Agent Builder
D. IBM Tivoli Common Reporting
Answer: B

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A. The vPC domain has already been configured
B. The vPC links have to be configured before the vPC domain can be added
C. vPC domain cannot be configured at the global prompt
D. Have not yet turned on the vpc feature using the 'feature vpc' command
Answer: D

NEW QUESTION: 3
What is the name of the protocol use to set up and manage Security Associations (SA) for IP Security (IPSec)?
A. Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
B. Secure Key Exchange Mechanism
C. Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol
D. Oakley
Answer: A
Explanation:
Explanation/Reference:
The Key management for IPSec is called the Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
Note: IKE underwent a series of improvements establishing IKEv2 with RFC 4306. The basis of this answer is IKEv2.
The IKE protocol is a hybrid of three other protocols: ISAKMP (Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol), Oakley and SKEME. ISAKMP provides a framework for authentication and key exchange, but does not define them (neither authentication nor key exchange). The Oakley protocol describes a series of modes for key exchange and the SKEME protocol defines key exchange techniques.
IKE-Internet Key Exchange. A hybrid protocol that implements Oakley and Skeme key exchanges inside the ISAKMP framework. IKE can be used with other protocols, but its initial implementation is with the IPSec protocol. IKE provides authentication of the IPSec peers, negotiates IPSec keys, and negotiates IPSec security associations.
IKE is implemented in accordance with RFC 2409, The Internet Key Exchange.
The Internet Key Exchange (IKE) security protocol is a key management protocol standard that is used in conjunction with the IPSec standard. IPSec can be configured without IKE, but IKE enhances IPSec by providing additional features, flexibility, and ease of configuration for the IPSec standard.
IKE is a hybrid protocol that implements the Oakley key exchange and the SKEME key exchange inside the Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) framework. (ISAKMP, Oakley, and SKEME are security protocols implemented by IKE.)
IKE automatically negotiates IPSec security associations (SAs) and enables IPSec secure communications without costly manual preconfiguration. Specifically, IKE provides these benefits:
*Eliminates the need to manually specify all the IPSec security parameters in the crypto maps at both peers.
*Allows you to specify a lifetime for the IPSec security association.
*Allows encryption keys to change during IPSec sessions.
*Allows IPSec to provide anti-replay services.
*Permits certification authority (CA) support for a manageable, scalable IPSec implementation.
*Allows dynamic authentication of peers.
About ISAKMP
The Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol (ISAKMP) is a framework that defines the phases for establishing a secure relationship and support for negotiation of security attributes, it does not establish sessions keys by itself, it is used along with the Oakley session key establishment protocol. The Secure Key Exchange Mechanism (SKEME) describes a secure exchange mechanism and Oakley defines the modes of operation needed to establish a secure connection.
ISAKMP provides a framework for Internet key management and provides the specific protocol support for negotiation of security attributes. Alone, it does not establish session keys. However it can be used with various session key establishment protocols, such as Oakley, to provide a complete solution to Internet key management.
About Oakley
The Oakley protocol uses a hybrid Diffie-Hellman technique to establish session keys on Internet hosts and routers. Oakley provides the important security property of Perfect Forward Secrecy (PFS) and is based on cryptographic techniques that have survived substantial public scrutiny. Oakley can be used by itself, if no attribute negotiation is needed, or Oakley can be used in conjunction with ISAKMP. When ISAKMP is used with Oakley, key escrow is not feasible.
The ISAKMP and Oakley protocols have been combined into a hybrid protocol. The resolution of ISAKMP with Oakley uses the framework of ISAKMP to support a subset of Oakley key exchange modes. This new key exchange protocol provides optional PFS, full security association attribute negotiation, and authentication methods that provide both repudiation and non-repudiation. Implementations of this protocol can be used to establish VPNs and also allow for users from remote sites (who may have a dynamically allocated IP address) access to a secure network.
About IPSec
The IETF's IPSec Working Group develops standards for IP-layer security mechanisms for both IPv4 and IPv6. The group also is developing generic key management protocols for use on the Internet. For more information, refer to the IP Security and Encryption Overview.
IPSec is a framework of open standards developed by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) that provides security for transmission of sensitive information over unprotected networks such as the Internet.
It acts at the network level and implements the following standards:
IPSec
Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
Data Encryption Standard (DES)
MD5 (HMAC variant)
SHA (HMAC variant)
Authentication Header (AH)
Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP)
IPSec services provide a robust security solution that is standards-based. IPSec also provides data authentication and anti-replay services in addition to data confidentiality services.
For more information regarding IPSec, refer to the chapter "Configuring IPSec Network Security." About SKEME
SKEME constitutes a compact protocol that supports a variety of realistic scenarios and security models over Internet. It provides clear tradeoffs between security and performance as required by the different scenarios without incurring in unnecessary system complexity. The protocol supports key exchange based on public key, key distribution centers, or manual installation, and provides for fast and secure key refreshment. In addition, SKEME selectively provides perfect forward secrecy, allows for replaceability and negotiation of the underlying cryptographic primitives, and addresses privacy issues as anonymity and repudiatability
SKEME's basic mode is based on the use of public keys and a Diffie-Hellman shared secret generation.
However, SKEME is not restricted to the use of public keys, but also allows the use of a pre-shared key.
This key can be obtained by manual distribution or by the intermediary of a key distribution center (KDC) such as Kerberos.
In short, SKEME contains four distinct modes:
Basic mode, which provides a key exchange based on public keys and ensures PFS thanks to Diffie- Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of public keys, but without Diffie-Hellman.
A key exchange based on the use of a pre-shared key and on Diffie-Hellman.
A mechanism of fast rekeying based only on symmetrical algorithms.
In addition, SKEME is composed of three phases: SHARE, EXCH and AUTH.
During the SHARE phase, the peers exchange half-keys, encrypted with their respective public keys.
These two half-keys are used to compute a secret key K. If anonymity is wanted, the identities of the two peers are also encrypted. If a shared secret already exists, this phase is skipped.
The exchange phase (EXCH) is used, depending on the selected mode, to exchange either Diffie- Hellman public values or nonces. The Diffie-Hellman shared secret will only be computed after the end of the exchanges.
The public values or nonces are authenticated during the authentication phase (AUTH), using the secret key established during the SHARE phase.
The messages from these three phases do not necessarily follow the order described above; in actual practice they are combined to minimize the number of exchanged messages.
References used for this question:
Source: KRUTZ, Ronald L. & VINES, Russel D., The CISSP Prep Guide: Mastering the Ten Domains of Computer Security, John Wiley & Sons, 2001, Chapter 4: Cryptography (page 172).
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4306
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4301
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_Key_Exchange
CISCO ISAKMP and OAKLEY information
CISCO Configuring Internet Key Exchange Protocol
http://www.hsc.fr/ressources/articles/ipsec-tech/index.html.en

NEW QUESTION: 4
A customer must perform trend analysis for future growth. Which product should be included in the design?
A. IBM System Director
B. IBM Tivoli Performance Analyzer
C. IBM Tivoli Monitoring Agent Builder
D. IBM Tivoli Common Reporting
Answer: B

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